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His Masters voice : unknown

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Forum » Manufacturer's / brands history » MANUFACTURERS and TRADE NAMES (present in the museum) » His Masters voice : unknown
           
Bruno Brasseur
Bruno Brasseur
 
B  Articles: 24
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29.Aug.05 18:58

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Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   1 Who knows this radio ?

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Omer Suleimanagich
Omer Suleimanagich
 
USA  Articles: 345
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Pict.: 55
30.Aug.05 04:01

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Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   2 This radio is a German, post WW II RCA brand radio.

If I'm not mistaken, most of these radios were made by Philips, West Germany in the 1950's for RCA.

I understand that other German manufacturers made these type of table radios for RCA too.

The reason I think that most of these radios were made by Philips, is that they used vacuum tubes instead of selenium rectifiers for the B+ in the fities. Most likely Philips did this, so they could sell more vacuum tubes.

With Philips products, everything was business first, and anything else second.

Omer
Walter Haring
Walter Haring
 
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30.Aug.05 10:38

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Hello Omer

Interesting! Can you show one of these RCA-Philips or proof otherwise that Philips produced RCA branded radios?

Why i'm asking? Simply because i own several post WWII RCA's and all resemble the US models in the kind how they are built - also the schematics show the typical layout for RCA although these radios were built for the European market and therefore are not documented in US schematic collections as Rider's or Beitman's. Also the use of octal tubes in these RCA radios instead of tubes typically made/used by Philips at that time frame let me think, that these radios were made by RCA itself and not by Philips.

Then too, i don't know of any connection between HMV and RCA, but our British collegues will shurely know more.

Kind regards, Walter
Omer Suleimanagich
Omer Suleimanagich
 
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30.Aug.05 17:50

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Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   4 RCA didn't make vacuum tube radios with sliderule scales that included FM (UKW), shortwave, and longwave.

I'm not sure of the model, but last year there was an EBay listing in Texas of an RCA radio I wanted to purchase. The same exact model was on a Philips web site as a mid fifties Philips model.

You might want to confirm this by going to, http://radiotechniek.cjb.net/, with your firewall and antivirus off, to download PDF files of schematics and service manuals.

Is the power tube a 6L6 or 6V6?

regards,

Omer
Omer Suleimanagich
Omer Suleimanagich
 
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31.Aug.05 08:55

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Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   5 What is the tube layout and what is the year of manufacture?

Omer
Omer Suleimanagich
Omer Suleimanagich
 
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31.Aug.05 10:03

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Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   6 Hi Walter,

Actually you have a very good point!

HMV (AKA "His Master's Voice) was a British company.

Here below is a Belgian made HMV, http://www.radiomuseum.org/r/hismasters_1113.html.

I'm still curious to know if there was a connection between RCA, HMV, and Marconiphone.

RCA did sell radios like this in Europe and also the US.

I hope someone out there could enlighten us about all of this.

Best regards,

Omer
Walter Haring
Walter Haring
 
CH  Articles: 200
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31.Aug.05 14:00

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Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   7
 
Hi Omer

You're asking for tube line up's etc. of my RCA's. Please see e.g.

http://www.radiomuseum.org/r/rca_5q31x.html  or

http://www.radiomuseum.org/r/rca_q110.html

These are radios without FM. The only RCA with FM that i own isn't in presentable condition. I kept it as future project, because, as far as i know, it's the world's first consumer FM radio with frequency range of 88 - 108 MHz (it dates back to 1947). But this one has FM and BC - no longwave or SW and was also sold in the USA (no special Euro-Version). For the moment, i can't remember having seen a RCA with all four wave bands, but i'm not a RCA-expert.

But - back to my question resulting of your statement in posting # 2 of this thread : can you show a RCA (or HMV) branded radio with Philips (Germany) "innards" that dates back to the 40ies or early 50ies as the HMV probably dates, that Mr Brasseur shows?

Kind regards, Walter Haring
Omer Suleimanagich
Omer Suleimanagich
 
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31.Aug.05 17:16

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Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   8 Please check RCA model numbers 4QR64X and 67QR77M.

I'll see if I can dig up some more info.

regards,

Omer
John Turrill
 
 
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30.Sep.05 04:44

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Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   9

Hello Omer,
                 though I can't help with identification of your radio; though I'm sure if it were HMV there would be identification somewhere on the chassis, back or cabinet - I can tell you there certainly was a connection between HMV and RCA. (but not, as far as I know, with regard to radio models).
  An American called Owen came to England and started a firm called "The Gramophone Company" - (His Master's Voice).  The controlling company was the "Victor Talking Machine Company", New Jersey, USA.
   After avoiding 'wireless' like the plague, they soon realised it was inevitable, and eventually merged with Marconiphone, Marconi-Osram Valve Co. and GEC.  
    The vital link was that, by now, the Victor Co. had been taken over by ----------- RCA! 
     To help clarify all this, these links may help ------
EE: All three links are dead by now - so I took them out: July 28, 2013

See also books, -"The Setmakers" by K. Geddes & G. Bussey, (With acknowledgements to these)
 and, -  "The Saga of Marconi-Osram Valves" by G. Jessop & B. Vyse.

Hope this is of use, kind regards,
                                                 John Turrill. 
(E&OE)  
 
 

This article was edited 28.Jul.13 21:05 by Ernst Erb .

  
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