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History of the manufacturer  

Eveready (Ever Ready), AENMC / National Carbon Company (NCC); Columbia

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Name: Eveready (Ever Ready), AENMC / National Carbon Company (NCC); Columbia    (USA)  
Abbreviation: eveready
Products: Model types Others Tube manufacturer
Summary:

National Carbon Company - NCC (1886)

American Electrical Novelty and Manufacturing Company - AENMC (1898)
American Ever Ready (1905)

Eveready (?)

Tubes are known of the brand Eveready-Raytheon by National Carbon (EX120). 

The company also produced a range of standard radio panel/dial lamps.

See also the brand Energizer.

Founded: 1886
History:

Eveready history goes back to 1886, when former Brush Electric Company executive (W. H. Lawrence) formed the National Carbon Company (NCC), today Energizer. In 1896, Eveready marketed the very first battery for consumer use - The Columbia - six inches tall and used to power home telephones.

Two years later in New York City, a Russian immigrant named Conrad Hubert founded the American Electrical Novelty and Manufacturing Company (AENMC) to market battery powered novelties. Hubert filed two patents in 1899 for his "Electric Hand Torch," a dry cell battery within a paper tube, with a bulb inside a rough brass reflector on one end of the tube-the building blocks for the world's first flashlight. 

In 1905, AENMC changed its name to American Ever Ready, focusing on the dependability of its flashlight products.

American Ever Ready became part of the National Carbon Company in 1914, forming the only manufacturer specializing in both batteries and lighting products. The National Carbon Company merged with Union Carbide Company in 1917, and began expanding across the United States and into Canada and Mexico.

Over the next 32 years, Union Carbide became known as the only full-line supplier of flashlights and batteries of all sizes. As Union Carbide expanded, the "Eveready" brand name became associated with the reliable power and performance needed to keep up with the rapid development of battery-powered devices.

In time, the company re-branded its products, introducing Energizer batteries and flashlights.

(

Eveready history goes back to 1886, when former Brush Electric Company executive (W. H. Lawrence) formed the National Carbon Company (NCC), today Energizer. In 1896, Eveready marketed the very first battery for consumer use - The Columbia - six inches tall and used to power home telephones.

Two years later in New York City, a Russian immigrant named Conrad Hubert founded the American Electrical Novelty and Manufacturing Company (AENMC) to market battery powered novelties. Hubert filed two patents in 1899 for his "Electric Hand Torch," a dry cell battery within a paper tube, with a bulb inside a rough brass reflector on one end of the tube-the building blocks for the world's first flashlight. 

In 1905, AENMC changed its name to American Ever Ready, focusing on the dependability of its flashlight products.

American Ever Ready became part of the National Carbon Company in 1914, forming the only manufacturer specializing in both batteries and lighting products. The National Carbon Company merged with Union Carbide Company in 1917, and began expanding across the United States and into Canada and Mexico.

Over the next 32 years, Union Carbide became known as the only full-line supplier of flashlights and batteries of all sizes. As Union Carbide expanded, the "Eveready" brand name became associated with the reliable power and performance needed to keep up with the rapid development of battery-powered devices.

In time, the company re-branded its products, introducing Energizer batteries and flashlights.

On June 1st, 1929 the National Carbon Company entered into an agreement with the Raytheon Manufacturing company of Cambridge, Massachusetts to become exclusive distributor of Raytheon receiving tubes. Factory space was increased considerably to allow for increased production. The brand name was changed to Eveready Raytheon and tube boxes reflected the Eveready print style and colours. The agreement was active until at least May - August of 1933, according to advertisements but officially lapsed by the National Carbon Co. in 1938. Tube type number prefixes were changed to ER--- and from information located, there were about 50 tube types made with the prefix. Almost all of these used the patented "four pillar" element mounting. A small number of tubes have been located with the regular "pinch" element mounting. ?)


Some models:
Country Year Name 1st Tube Notes
USA  18 Reserve Dry Cell    
USA  35 B-Battery 585   45V "B" battery with 3 prong socket used in non-portable and farm radios.... 
USA  38 740   Heavy duty 1.5V "A" battery with 2 prong socket used in portable and farm radios. 
USA  43 741   Heavy duty 1.5V "A" battery with 2 prong socket used in portable and farm... 
USA  43 743   Standard duty 1.5V "A" battery with 2 prong socket used in portable and farm radios. 
USA  38 747   Heavy duty 6V "A" battery with 2 prong socket used in portable and farm radios. 
USA  38 746   Heavy duty 4.5V "A" battery with 2 prong socket used in portable and farm radios. 
USA  70 AA Battery 1015 [Industria Argentina]   Eveready AA Battery, Industria Argentina, by Union Carbide. 
USA  15 Eveready Volts and Amperes Meter   Eveready Volts and Amperes "pocket watch case" battery tester.  Pat.Aug 9,1910 on fro... 
USA  27 Model 1 Loud Speaker   This is the external speaker for the Model 1 radio. 
USA  55 Radio Battery Tester R-1795   Eveready Radio Battery Tester R-1795.  Meter ranges are REPLACE, WEAK and GOOD. ... 
USA  60 Nine Lives Neda 200 - No.467    

[rmxhdet-en]

Further details for this manufacturer by the members (rmfiorg):

tbn_usa_eveready_1938_logo.jpg
tbn_usa_eveready_1938_logo1.jpg
tbn_usa_eveready_1938_logo2.jpg
Aus Werbung ca. 1925tbn_usa_eveready_1925_filialen.jpg
US advert ~1929tbn_us_nationalcarbon_televisiontubes_advert.jpg
Radio News for August 1922tbn_us_eveready_advert-1922.jpg
Adv. Radio Broadcast, Apr. 1930, p. 341tbn_usa_eveready.jpg
Radio Broadcast, Nov. 1925, p. 71tbn_usa_eveready~~1.jpg
Radio Broadcast, Aug. 1924, p. 359tbn_usa_eveready_2.jpg
Radio Broadcast, Nov. 1924, p. 113tbn_usa_eveready_4.jpg
Radio Broadcast, Mar. 1925, p. 947tbn_usa_eveready~~2.jpg
Radio Broadcast, Jan. 1926, p. 353tbn_usa_eveready_2~~1.jpg
Radio Broadcast, Feb, 1926, p. 485tbn_usa_eveready_3~~1.jpg
Radio Broadcast, Mar. 1926, p. 597tbn_usa_eveready_4~~1.jpg
Radio Broadcast, Apr. 1926, p. 700tbn_usa_eveready_5.jpg
February 1924 Radio Journal magazine advertisement page 56tbn_usa_eveready_ad_february_1924_radio_journal_page_56.jpg
Vintage Ad from 1948 - The Saturday Evening Post - Page 79tbn_usa_eveready_vintage_ad_1948.jpg
Advert 1967tbn_usa_eveready_1967.jpg
tbn_usa_eveready_advertise.jpg
Advert in "The Saturday Evening Post" September 6, 1924tbn_us_eveready_b_battery_advert_1924.jpg
"Nine 9 Lives" Advert 1953tbn_us_eveready_9_lives_batteries_advert_1953.jpg
Eveready advert in "The Australian Women´s Weekly" -March 27, 1957tbn_aus_eveready_advert_1957.jpg
Eveready Australia "Nine 9 Lives" advert 1954tbn_aus_eveready_batt_advert_1954.jpg
Australian Eveready battery advert 1981tbn_aus_eveready_black_advert_1981.jpg
Eveready Australia June 9, 1945 advert in Newspaper "The Australian Women´s Weekly".tbn_aus_eveready_advert_1945.jpg
Australian Wheels Magazine, 1984tbn_us_eveready_energizer_advert_1984.jpg
Eveready Raytheon advert Radio Engineering June, 1929tbn_eveready_raytheon_re_629.png
(Co-branding by National Carbon, 1929)tbn_usa_eveready_raytheon_cobranding_logo.jpg
tbn_usa_eveready_logo_9lives.jpg
Popular Science December 1929tbn_eveready_raytheon_ps1229.png
Popular Science April 1930tbn_eveready_raytheon_ps430.png
Popular Science June 1930tbn_eveready_raytheon_ps630.png

  
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