radiomuseum.org

 
Please click your language flag. Bitte Sprachflagge klicken.

History of the manufacturer  

Kipp Co. Ltd., H.M.; Toronto

As a member you can upload pictures (but not single models please) and add text.
Both will display your name after an officer has activated your content, and will be displayed under «Further details ...» plus the text also in the forum.
Name: Kipp Co. Ltd., H.M.; Toronto    (CDN)  
Abbreviation: kipp
Products: Model types Others
Summary:

H.M. Kipp Company Ltd.; 447 Yonge, Toronto. This was actually a motorcycle dealer but this company made some radio models and the famous "Mercury Super Ten" (Mercury-Super 10) in mid 1920s.

History:
In the early 1920's a young Toronto, Canada engineer, Charles Lowry (1895-1976), realized that superheterodyne was the way of the future and set out to design a receiver that would be simple enough to be used by the public since the U.S.A. RCA patent was not enforced in Canada at that time. His circuit used 10 Northern Electric R215-A "Peanut" tubes, a small robust triode of Western Electric design used in telephone repeaters.
In early 1924 Lowry approached a Toronto motorcycle dealer and accessory company, H.M. Kipp Ltd., to build sets to his designs since they were interested in selling radios during their less active winter period. The product of this association was a battery operated set called the "Mercury Super-Ten" and it was sold, assembled or in kit form, from 1925 until 1930. In 1927, Charles Lowry and Kipp could not agree on how to convert the Mercury to operate from household A.C. and Lowry left the company to work for the DeForest Radio Corporation. The Kipp company produced a few different designs in following years but the depression caused a drop in sales of "high end" radios and they abandoned the radio business in 1932.
By late 1927 it was estimated that 7,000 sets had been sold. The basic design of the Super-Ten remained the same for much of it's first 5 years of life although most Mercury chassis found today differ slightly from one another. The sets found today tend to differ often in their outward appearance since they could be purchased as a kit of parts, a fully assembled chassis with front panel or a fully assembled radio housed in one of three models of cabinets and each one could be supplied with black or brown wood grain bakelite with plain or vernier slow-motion dials.


Some models:
Country Year Name 1st Tube Notes
CDN  25–27 Mercury Super Ten (Standard) Mercury Super 10 [Renaissance cabinet] R215A  This is a Standard model but in a luxury "Renaissance" cabinet. All Super Ten employed 10 ... 
CDN  25–27 Mercury Super Ten (Standard) Mercury Super 10 [Standard cabinet] R215A  All Super Ten employed 10 "Peanut" tubes - and the radio (included it's siblings) was tout... 
CDN  24 Mercury Super Ten experimental prototype [1924] R215A  The booklet "The Story of The Mercury Super Ten", a catalogue No. 74, October 1st 1928 of ... 
CDN  28/29 Mercury Super Ten Super 10 [1928] R215A  Also known as the Standard Mercury model or model H cabinet. The cabinet is probably made ... 
CDN  25–27 Mercury Super Ten (DeLuxe Mercury Super 10 [mahogany] R215A  This version of the Super Ten is also known as the DeLuxe Mercury model.It employed not le... 
CDN  30 Mercury 5SG Ten (S-G-10; SG5-10) 227  Separate Power Box connected by a 10 pole cable with main chassis. 
CDN  30 Mercury SG (Battery model) 230  Push-pull output stage. 
CDN  30 Mercury Mantel Set 224   
CDN  25–27 Mercury Super Ten (DeLuxe) Mercury Super 10 [walnut] R215A  This version of the Super Ten is also known as the DeLuxe Mercury model - here the walnut ... 

[rmxhdet-en]
  
rmXorg