philips: 161U - Brimistor, Varistor or Varite in AC/DC re

ID: 210265
? philips: 161U - Brimistor, Varistor or Varite in AC/DC re 
13.Jan.10 17:24
4

Robert Sarbell † 22.3.22 (USA)
Articles: 363
Count of Thanks: 9
Robert Sarbell † 22.3.22

Gentlemen,

With specific reference to the excellemt 2006 forum posts about the items above. . . . .

I have recently acquired the Philips GB Service manual for the radio in question; and would like comments to clarify which specific part would be the replacement for items R5 and R19 in the power supply of the receiver.

The tube lineup consists of the 100mA series tubes.

However, the parts list only shows the following numbers 49.379.62 for "resistor" R5 and 49.379.67 for "resistor" part R19 - and they are identified as "Varite".

There are no values provided for the resistance or wattage or tolerances - would it be permissible to use the BRIMISTOR data to presume the appropriate replacement as equivalent to the CZ3?

Respectfully,
Robert

NOTE: I ask this question based upon substitution of the C1 regulator in my early Philips AL161 AC/DC receiver from Argentina

 

To thank the Author because you find the post helpful or well done.

 2
Roberts 
13.Jan.10 17:42
4 from 4557

Carlos Romualdo Landi (RA)
Articles: 52
Count of Thanks: 9
Carlos Romualdo Landi

Hi Robert, I missed here in the forums to state a premium, jajaj, wanted to take this opportunity to greet this new year and all your wishes come true having a big year.

Solve the problem of your mail or has a new address ...? , I wrote a couple of chances and I did not get any contestacón is always pleasant to be in communication with you and if you need something let me know .- Argentina

My best regards

Respectfully

Carlos Landi

To thank the Author because you find the post helpful or well done.

 3
Varite (thermistor) for Philips 161U 
13.Jan.10 21:05
37 from 4557

Howard Craven (GB)
Articles: 110
Count of Thanks: 6

 

Hello Robert,

I know the resistance value of one of the varites in your 161U radio, R19 part number 49.379.67 is 10k ohms when cold and 250 ohms when hot. Alternative but redundant parts to the Philips were the Mullard VA1010 or the Radiospares TH6 thermistors. I have no information on the other one unfortunately. It's not a good idea to replace these with a fixed value resistor.

Finding data on Philips thermistors is difficult, and spare new old stock examples are virtually non-existant in the UK now but I might be able to obtain a used working 49.379.67 varite for your radio, and the other one too if someone can supply its characteristics, as I know of a good source of secondhand parts here.

If you can find a Brimistor to match the original Philips then use it ..... and let us know if you're successful.

Regards ........ Howard

.

 

To thank the Author because you find the post helpful or well done.

 4
? What is the British 'Varite' part? 
14.Jan.10 01:39
58 from 4557

Robert Sarbell † 22.3.22 (USA)
Articles: 363
Count of Thanks: 9
Robert Sarbell † 22.3.22

Hello Howard,

I do NOT have the receiver - just the complete Service manual. . .my question was asked to determine if the "Varite" was a voltage dependent resistor or the temperature coefficient resistor (either positive or negative influenced), or something like a ferrite bead?

Also, if the restorer found a defective R5 or R19 "resistor" in the radio (sometimes mounted like a cylinfrical fuse) what ratings would he use in lieu of the part number for replacement purposes?

Respectfully,

Robert

To thank the Author because you find the post helpful or well done.

 5
? Philips Varite part numbers - or Mullard 
19.Jan.10 18:07
173 from 4557

Robert Sarbell † 22.3.22 (USA)
Articles: 363
Count of Thanks: 9
Robert Sarbell † 22.3.22

Hello Howard and Carlos,

Thank you so much for helping me to resolve the "mysterious" part number to specific component dilemma

Although I have not yet located a Philips GB-produced document to specifically identify the Varite resistors used on their model 161U receiver, I have recently acquired an excellent 8-page document MK/116 Ed. 1 BRIMISTORS produced by Standard Telephones and Cables Limited - STC published in 1958 - which offers a complete discussion of Characteristics and Operation of Brimistors.

The technical data expands upon that which was proffered by Mr John Turill, and discussed by several other members to differentiate between the various "regulating resistors" and the method of regulation.

Please refer to the Forum postings: Some thermistor data which is found in the Repair and Restauration: Tips and Tricks. . . . . .

The attached STC Brimistors brochure provides an excellent Table of Data for three styles of the Brimistors available as of 1958 from STC - the Types listing identifies three outlines to the C-series from CZ1 through CZ12A

Respectfully,
Robert
 

Attachments:

To thank the Author because you find the post helpful or well done.

 6
This thread was moved automatically. 

This question was moved automatically to the board "Talk" to get more possibilities for answers.

Moved from board »RADIO MODELS DISPLAYED« on 25.Jan.10 18:07 from automatically 

 7
NTC-Resistor 
12.Jul.10 07:54
290 from 4557

Wolfgang Bauer (A)
Articles: 2464
Count of Thanks: 6
Wolfgang Bauer


Hallo Robert,

these are very normal 100mA NTC-resistors.

Regards WB.

To thank the Author because you find the post helpful or well done.

 8
This thread was moved back manually because it received a valid answer. 

Moved from board »* TALK - visible for members only« on 12.Jul.10 07:55 from Wolfgang Bauer 

 9
Semantics or Terminology or Hersteller  
12.Jul.10 15:20
334 from 4557

Robert Sarbell † 22.3.22 (USA)
Articles: 363
Count of Thanks: 4
Robert Sarbell † 22.3.22

Hello Wolfgang,

Thank you for the clarification that these are the Negative Temperature Coefficient (NTC) type resistors?!

After reading your referenced article, I understand the Brimistors to be the same as NTC resistors. In fact, identical to the "negativem Temperatur-koeffizienten" widerstand, but I was unsure of the current rating - from either the milliamps or more typical rating in Watts or portions thereof.

Respectfully,

Robert

 

To thank the Author because you find the post helpful or well done.

 10
NTK / NTC 
12.Jul.10 15:38
342 from 4557

Wolfgang Bauer (A)
Articles: 2464
Count of Thanks: 6
Wolfgang Bauer


This is correct, it is a negative-temperature-coefficient resistor (NTC).
Also look for this post, unfortunately for you in German ==>NTK, Materialien und Funktion.
 
Best regards WB.

To thank the Author because you find the post helpful or well done.

 11
Philips 'NTK / NTC' - Widerstände open text 
12.Jul.10 17:13
360 from 4557

Thomas Günzel † 1.8.22 (D)
Articles: 212
Count of Thanks: 5
Thomas Günzel † 1.8.22

 

Hier noch mit Hilfe von OCR, der Text des Artikels damit es auch von Google gelesen und übersetzt werden kann:
For translation-purposes with Google -Translate or others, here the original german text
 
 

Philips „NTK“ Widerstände

 
Bekanntlich nimmt der Widerstandswert von metallischen Leitern bei steigender Temperatur zu. Diese Widerstandszunahme pro Grad, welche für jedes Material einen anderen Wert darstellt, wird als positiver Temperaturkoeffizient bezeichnet.
In der Radiotechnik ist es mitunter vorteilhaft, Widerstände mit negativem Temperaturkoeffizienten zu verwenden. Das sind Widerstände aus Materialien, deren Widerstandswert mit steigender Temperatur abnimmt.
Es wurden verschiedentlich Widerstände mit diesen Eigenschaften entwickelt, die jedoch gewisse Mängel zeigten. Solche Widerstände bestehen aus einem Gemisch aus leitenden und nichtleitenden Körnern verschiedener Substanzen, die auf chemisch-mechanischem Wege (Sintern) zu einem festen Gefüge vereinigt werden.
So wurden z. B. Widerstände hergestellt, die aus einem Silizium-Pulver und Ton bestehen. Der Widerstandswert eines solchen Widerstandes wird dabei durch den Übergangswiderstand von einem Siliziumkorn zum anderen bestimmt. Er ist sehr stark vom Mischungsverhältnis abhängig und schwer reproduzierbar. Außerdem besteht die Gefahr, daß die Widerstandsmasse nicht homogen genug ist und der Strom sich daher auf bestimmte Bahnen konzentriert. Dies hat ungleichmäßige Erwärmungen zur Folge, welche einseitige Widerstandsverringerungen, unter Umständen sogar vollständige Kurzschlüsse bewirken können. Da Silizium außerdem leicht oxydiert, können solche Widerstände nur unter besonderen Maßnahmen verwendet werden.
Systematische Untersuchungen in den Philips Laboratorien mit dem neuen magnetischen Werkstoff „Ferroxcube“ haben gezeigt, daß Mischkristalle den elektrischen Strom nicht nur leiten, sondern daß ihr Widerstand unter Umständen sehr stark temperaturabhängig ist sind und bei Temperaturzunahme abnimmt Da Mischkristalle unter allen Umständen homogen sind, ist eine gleichmäßige Stromverteilung gewährleistet.
Widerstände aus Mischkristallen von Magneteisenstein und anderen Spinellen, z. B. Magnesiumaluminat usw., werden von Philips als „NTK“ Widerstände bezeichnet. Diese „NTK“ Widerstände werden auf keramischem Wege hergestellt. Dabei können durch entsprechende Wahl des Mischungsverhältnisses Werkstoffe mit genügend genauen Widerstandswerten und Temperaturkoeffizienten erhalten werden. Philips „NTK“ Widerstände sind sehr stabil und können in den meisten Fällen ohne besondere Maßnahmen verwendet werden.
Die praktischen Gebrauchstemperaturen liegen zwischen -100 und +300 Grad Celsius. Lediglich bei noch höheren Temperaturen müßte man „NTK“ Widerstände im Vakuum oder in einem geeigneten Gas, wie z. B. Stickstoff verwenden. Da bei Belastung der Widerstände Wärme erzeugt wird, die wieder den Temperaturkoeffizienten verändert, ist die äußere Formgebung und die damit verbundene Oberflächenabstrahlung von größter Bedeutung. So werden Philips „NTK“ Widerstände in verschiedenen Formen wie z. B. Stäbchen, Röhrchen, Plättchen in Kugelform und sogar als dünne Drähte und Folien hergestellt Philips „NTK“ Widerstände werden heute bereits vielseitig angewandt, z.B. als:
 
Spannungsstabilisator
Thermometer
Bolometer zur Energiemessung bei infraroter Strahlung und bei Radiowellen sehr hoher Frequenz,
Relais, verschiedenster Art,
Hochfrequenz Wattmeter,
Vakuummeter, in der Mikrometeorologie und schließlich als Einschaltwiderstand für Radioapparate.
 
Besonders in der Radiotechnik werden „NTK“ Widerstände in letzter Zeit häufig verwendet.
Bei Radioröhren mit indirekter Heizung dauert es einige Zeit, bis die Kathode ihre Betriebstemperatur erreicht hat. Da der Temperaturkoeffizient der Heizfäden positiv ist, ist der Widerstand dieser Fäden beim Einschalten im kalten Zustand niedriger als bei der Betriebstemperatur. Sind nun die Heizfäden in Reihe mit anderen Einzelteilen (z. B. mit einem Lämpchen für die Skalenbeleuchtung) geschaltet, dann liegt beim Einschalten eine erhöhte Spannung an diesen Schaltelementen. Ein Umstand, der von sehr nachteiligen Folgen sein kann.
Diese lassen sich in einfacher Weise dadurch verhüten, daß man einen „NTK“ Widerstand in die Serienschaltung aufnimmt Widerstandswert und Temperaturkoeffizient können dann so gewählt werden, daß die Zusatzspannung beim Einschalten im kalten Zustand fast ganz durch den „NTK“ Widerstand aufgenommen wird. Bei normaler Betriebstemperatur ist dann der Widerstandswert des „NTK“ Widerstandes praktisch Null. Dieses Prinzip ist natürlich nicht allein auf Radiogeräte beschränkt, sondern kann z. B. auch zum Herabsetzen der Einschaltstromspitze von Elektromotoren etc. angewendet werden.
Mit diesen „NTK“ Widerständen hat Philips wieder ein neues Schaltelement geschaffen, welches bereits auch von der übrigen Radio- und Elektroindustrie verwendet wird und einen Fortschritt auf diesem Gebiet bedeutet.

 

To thank the Author because you find the post helpful or well done.

 12
Many Thanks - Other Comments 
12.Jul.10 18:31
383 from 4557

Robert Sarbell † 22.3.22 (USA)
Articles: 363
Count of Thanks: 6
Robert Sarbell † 22.3.22

Hello Thomas,

Thank you so much for the "open text" of the Philips NTK/NTC resistors. . . .I was able to understand much of the article without the Babelfish translation. However, this will make it even cleared to me. I have been using the translater since I joined in 2003!

I am seriously considering another topic to submit to the more senior radio engineers as it relates to the "peculiar" B+ power supplies of the early SABA Villingen and Waldbad models which vacillated from a tube rectifier to the solid state diode (or diodes) and then back to the EZ80 tube. I am aware that some methods avoid the center tapped secondaries in favor of an "end tapped circuit" with both plates on the same end, but it does not seem to be used commonly in the "higher priced" SABA models!

I have followed several forum postings of the these models - although I do not own one of these models. I have been reviewing 7 or 8 schematics trying to arrive at a plausible explanation!!

Respectfully,

Robert

 

To thank the Author because you find the post helpful or well done.