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The repair of High Gloss polished Varnish-Polyesterlack

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Forum » Technique, Repair, Restoration, Home construction ** » Cleaning and restoring » The repair of High Gloss polished Varnish-Polyesterlack
           
Robert Sottile
 
 
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26.Apr.07 03:51

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My questions all refer to the article written by Mr. Martin Renz, dated March 13, 2006 which I believe is entitled as I have written above.  I have been translating this article from German into English, with the help of a German speaking friend here in the USA and referring, at times, to the LEO web-site.  I am restoring a 1960 Blaupunkt Console radio with a badly damaged finish.  I believe that this, as well as other Blaupunkt radios from this period, have what is called in the U.S. a "conversion varnish" type finish-it appears to be impervious to lacquer thinner and acetone solvents, which would affect both lacquer and ordinary varnish type finishes.  Mr. Renz appears to be repairing the finish to his radio, rather than stripping it entirely and refinishing with a new finish, so I believe that he details a procedure which would also be useful in my case.  I am hoping that a German speaking member, that is conversant in English, can translate certain words, which I will list, which would help me determine Mr. Renz's true meaning.  In the section entitled "Abbeizen" (Stripping?) the author reccomends removing the "cracked lacquer?" with "Gruneck."  Is this a brand of chemical stripper available in Germany, and if so, what type of stripper is it?  The article refers to "Polyesterlack, Polyestergiesharz and Giesharz-what are the English versions of these words?  LEO translates "harz" as resin, but what kind of resin?  What are the commercial versions of these products?  Under "Vorbehandlung der Aussenflachen" (Preparations for _______finish?) , the author recommends removing portions of the damaged finish with a "Schnitzmesser" which I am told refers to some kind of "carving knife."  This does not make sense to me.  What kind of tool is meant by "Schnitzmesser"?  The author states that the repair material he used is no longer readily available, but that "piano makers" and "armature repairers" still have need for this material and that it may also be bought at a "Bastelgeschaft".  What is the repair material and what is the translation for "Bastelgeschaft"?  I realize that this post is already very long and will end it here.  Thanks for any help that other members can provide.

Robert Sottile

This article was edited 26.Apr.07 04:22 by Robert Sottile .

Mark Hippenstiel
Mark Hippenstiel
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26.Apr.07 22:40

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Dear Robert,

I will get back to you via email.

Regards
Mark

Laurence W. Stewart
Laurence W. Stewart
 
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04.Feb.08 22:14

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Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   3 Dear Robert:

May I ask if the translation referenced in your post was ever completed?  I am working on a nearly pristine Grundig KS490WE which has just a few small cosmetic warts.  Stripping and refinishing will definitely not be required.  However, I would like to know how to make very small repairs.
Martin Renz
Martin Renz
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05.Feb.08 10:21

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Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   4 As there seems to be some interest, I would enjoy to help with the translation of the article into the English language. If any English speaking member could do the translation, I would do the layout and insert the pictures, as they are on the server anyway, and I easily could integrate them.
I had some emails with Robert and Mark in April, where we explained some of the words, that are hard to translate. I can publish this here, but the better way would be the complete translation by a native English speaking person.
I show in the article, how to repair this special varnish. The materials should be available all over the world and you need no expensive tools.
The varnish itself is getting rare nowadays, as only piano makers  and some high end car and boat suppliers still use this kind of varnish. A repair will be easier and cheaper in many  cases.

Regards

Martin

This article was edited 05.Feb.08 10:22 by Martin Renz .

Laurence W. Stewart
Laurence W. Stewart
 
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06.Feb.08 00:04

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I studied German so long ago (1957 to 1961) that I only remember a few phrases.  However, if I could get an intermediate working translation I would be willing to try to clean up the English grammar.
Thomas Albrecht
Thomas Albrecht
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06.Feb.08 04:13

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I'll translate the article for you.  Please give me one day, since the article is quite long.  I'll post it as a new article, with a link here.  Looks like an interesting and useful article that our English readers would benefit from.

Best regards,

Tom

Omer Suleimanagich
Omer Suleimanagich
 
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06.Feb.08 04:35

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Tom,

I was just thinking of suggesting you for the task.

After the fantastic speaker repair thread  (with many of the greats participating on this on this side of the Atlantic), I think that we finally acheived a "brain trust" in North America for German radios!

Naturally, this would never be realized without the founders of RMorg.

 

Omer

 

Thomas Albrecht
Thomas Albrecht
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06.Feb.08 10:23

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Larry, Omer, Robert, and other English readers:

You can find the translation of Martin's article here.

Martin,

If you see anything in the article that isn't translated properly or has the wrong terminology, feel free to edit directly, or send me an email and I will gladly update the translation.

Thanks for writing this article, which will now be appreicated by English readers as well!

Best regards,

Tom

This article was edited 06.Feb.08 10:51 by Thomas Albrecht .

  
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