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How to find & accommodate tubes on the rm.org tube pages

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Forum » Valves / tubes - Semiconductors » Valves / Tubes; practical use and procurement » How to find & accommodate tubes on the rm.org tube pages
           
Jacob Roschy
Jacob Roschy
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Variants of tubes with same designation:
 
There are certain designs of tubes & valves which differs in their construction from their original version, but still have the same electrical properties as the original version and are normally interchangeable. Those tubes we call tube variants.
   
As long as a tube variant still has the same designation as its original version, we accommodate this tube at the normal page of the tube in question, but under a special section called "Variant".
   
Each tube variant should be introduced under its normal designation, followed by a ~ (tilde or swung dash), followed by a remark that expresses the kind of the variant.
     
 
A good example for tube variants is shown under ECH11.  
Unfortunately by now the variant expression is only in the German language, which should be changed in the future.
 
 
Variants of tubes with different designation:
   
Those designs of tubes which differs in their construction from their original version but also having a different or a special extended designation, as particularly in the case of octal tubes, such as 6K7, 6K7G, 6K7GT or 6K7MG,
we keep as independent types, but we link them each other within the column: "similar tubes".
   
 
These tubes are interchangeable under certain conditions.
In HF and RF stages a realignment of the environmental circuit may be required, glass tubes may require additional shielding.
In AF or rectifier stages they are normally interchangeable without regarding any conditions.
 
 
   
Tubes with the same designation, but different characteristics or properties:
 
If under a certain designation more then one tube with different characteristics or properties appears, we distinguish them by adding an _underline character behind its actual designation, followed by a further remark, as shown by the examples UL2 and UL2_Dario
   
The more common version, or simply the version first appeared to us, we retain under its original designation, as in this case the UL2 version made by Valvo.
 
 
To any further tube with the same designation, an _extension is attached which gives a clou about its particularity. In the case of the UL2_Dario it’s the French maker company Dario.
 
 
Russian (or soviet) tubes:
 
Since the software of the tube pages system can not handle Cyrillic characters, we decided to replace them by lower case Latin characters by using this transliteration table:
 
 

 

 Cyr

А

В

Б

Г

  

lat.

a

v

b

g

Д

 

Е

Ж

И


К

 

d

e

j

i

k
 

Л

М

Н

О
 

l

m

n

o
 

П

Р

С

Т

У
 

p

r

s

t

u
 

 Ф

 

Х

Ц

Э

 f

 

h

z

ee

 

  

   
The lower case characters are necessary to distinguish them from western tube types.
 
If you find a Russian tube designated with 6Ж8, then look to the table above, where you will see Ж = j, then you will know you can find this tube under 6j8.

 

 

This article was edited 14.Mar.12 21:06 by Jacob Roschy .

Michael Watterson
 
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See this article for  Russian tubes and transliteration

Basically "CAPITAL" letters are normal Tube/Valve identification and  "lower case" letters are "Roman" transliteration of Cyrillic letters (Capital or lower case).

Extract

 

А Б В Г Д Е Ж И К Л М Н О П Р С Т У Ф Х Ц Э З Я
a b v g d e j i k l m n o p r s t u f h z ee ze ya

To reduce confusion transliterated Cyrillic letters in Roman/Latin are typed in lower case as in the table.  You can use the Character Map tool in Accessories in all Windows versions to type Cyrillic. Similar tools are in Linux, Solaris and OS X. When first discussing a part it's a good idea to put the Cyrillic designation in bold in brackets at least once after the transliteration above.

b, v, e, j and p are common.

  
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