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CSIRAC early Computer

CSIRAC early Computer; CSIRO Division of (ID = 1316943) Misc
 
CSIRAC early Computer; CSIRO Division of (ID = 1316941) Misc
 
CSIRAC early Computer; CSIRO Division of (ID = 1316942) Misc
 
CSIRAC early Computer; CSIRO Division of (ID = 1316944) Misc
 
CSIRAC early Computer; CSIRO Division of (ID = 1316945) Misc
 
CSIRAC early Computer; CSIRO Division of (ID = 1316947) Misc
CSIRAC early Computer; CSIRO Division of (ID = 1311893) Misc CSIRAC early Computer; CSIRO Division of (ID = 1311894) Misc
CSIRAC early Computer; CSIRO Division of (ID = 1311895) Misc CSIRAC early Computer; CSIRO Division of (ID = 1311896) Misc
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CSIRAC early Computer; CSIRO Division of (ID = 1311893) Misc
CSIRO Division of: CSIRAC early Computer [Misc] ID = 1311893 933x393
Select picture or schematic to display from thumbnails on the right and click for download.
For model CSIRAC early Computer, CSIRO Division of Radiophysics, Epping, New South Wales:
Australia's first digital computer, and the fourth stored program computer in the world. First run in November 1949, it is the only intact first-generation computer in the world, and is on permanent display at the Melbourne Museum.
Taken by John O'Neill
 
Country:  Australia
Manufacturer / Brand:  CSIRO Division of Radiophysics, Epping, New South Wales
Year: 1949 Type: Miscellaneous (Other, Various)
Valves / Tubes 2000: 6SA7 6V6 6SN7 EA50 KT66
Principle Audio-Amplification; 2 AF stage(s)
Wave bands - without
Details
Power type and voltage Alternating Current supply (AC)
Loudspeaker Permanent Magnet Dynamic (PDyn) Loudspeaker (moving coil)
Power out
from Radiomuseum.org Model: CSIRAC early Computer - CSIRO Division of Radiophysics
Material Metal case
Shape Rack
Notes

The fourth computer in the world, CSIRAC (pronounced 'sigh-rack') was designed and built in Australia. It made its first successful test run in November 1949.

CSIRAC is derived from Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Automatic Computer.

CSIRAC was a serial computer with mercury acoustic delay-line memory

The speaker's main purpose was for debugging. It was connected to the machine as an I/O device and instructions would be placed in the main program to produce "clicks" from the speaker. The operator would then know if the program had reached that part of the code successfully. - The first computer to play music was CSIRAC.

Speed .001MHz

Word size 20 bit

RAM 768 words

Disk capacity 2048 words

Power consumption 30,000 watts

2000 tubes

In the eight years of operation (about 30,000 hours of 'uptime') at Melbourne University, over 700 computing projects were processed by CSIRAC. One project was Computation of the radiation patterns of the rhombic antennae used by the Army Signals Branch at Donnybrook.

The CSIRAC is now in the  MV Melbourne Museum.   CSIRAC is the only intact first-generation computer surviving anywhere in the world.

 

Net weight (2.2 lb = 1 kg) 7000 kg / 15418 lb 8 oz (15418.502 lb)
Mentioned in MuseumVictoria

Model page created by Heribert Jung. See "Data change" for further contributors.

All listed radios etc. from CSIRO Division of Radiophysics, Epping, New South Wales
Here you find 1 models, 1 with images and 1 with schematics.


  
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