radiomuseum.org
Please click your language flag. Bitte Sprachflagge klicken.

British Valve production up to late '50's

Moderators:
Ernst Erb Jacob Roschy Bernhard Nagel 
 
Please click the blue info button to read more about this page.
Forum » Manufacturer's / brands history » Tube manufacturers » British Valve production up to late '50's
           
John Turrill
 
 
GB  Articles: 82
Schem.: 18
Pict.: 10
16.Aug.06 23:19

Count of Thanks: 3
Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   1

Dear members,  

I recently found a link for a British report to parliament giving details of valve production in Britain from earliest days up until the late 1950's.

The full report is quite a big download, but a page giving links to the individual chapters is available.     Chapter 2 has perhaps most general interest, so here is the link for that -

www.competition-commission.org.uk/rep_pub/reports/1950_1959/fulltext/020c02.pdf

Being an official report, I would expect this to be accurate and authentic, and though it isn't really concerned with individual valve types, I would rate it as a valuable and interesting document.               The page leading to all chapters is here -

Regards,
                John Turrill.

This article was edited 16.Aug.06 23:23 by John Turrill .

Hans-Thomas Schmidt
Hans-Thomas Schmidt
Editor
D  Articles: 508
Schem.: 7
Pict.: 4
19.Aug.06 21:39

Count of Thanks: 7
Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   2
 
Hi John,

thank you for this good link. The whole report is very interesting and gives a good overview about britain valve production.

But I have a question: In this report they tell about tubes and valves. What is the difference in great britain?

Best regards from munich bavaria,  Hans-Thomas

This article was edited 19.Aug.06 21:40 by Hans-Thomas Schmidt .

Ernst Erb
Ernst Erb
Officer
CH  Articles: 5653
Schem.: 13753
Pict.: 30965
19.Aug.06 22:47

Count of Thanks: 11
Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   3 There is no difference at all: In GB and Dominions the term valve is used for the same thing in the US called tubes.
John Turrill
 
 
GB  Articles: 82
Schem.: 18
Pict.: 10
20.Aug.06 03:11

Count of Thanks: 5
Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   4
 
Dear Hans- Thomas,
whilst of course Ernest is corect in his description of the terminology,
I should have described the article as referring to "valves & tubes", as
it does actually include both valves and T/V or picture tubes.
Somewhere I remember seeing a list describing which countries use
the word "valve" and which the word "tube", - possibly it's in RMorg.
In Britain, "valve" has always been used exclusively, except that more
recently, due to excessive U/S commercial influence, a whole new
generation has grown up to use American language, so that "tube" is,
sadly, used increasingly. (I happen to believe the word valve is  more
accurately descriptive than vaccuum tube, but let's not get too controversial!)
Back to the report, I found the chapter dealing with the relationship
between Philips and Mullard quite interesting and revealing. (ch.12) 
Regards from the land of valves!,
                                                  John.
 

This article was edited 20.Aug.06 03:13 by John Turrill .

Mario Candelarezi
 
 
RA  Articles: 24
Schem.: 0
Pict.: 31
20.Aug.06 05:16

Count of Thanks: 5
Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   5 and everywhere John, the old fashion "valve" is as you say "more accurately descriptive" and definitively more distinguished. Thermionic Valve has class and refinement whereas tube sound like "glass bottle". Of course, this opinion is absolutely free of technical appreciations or ethnic considerations. regards Mario

This article was edited 03.Dec.06 00:22 by Mario Candelarezi .

Hans-Thomas Schmidt
Hans-Thomas Schmidt
Editor
D  Articles: 508
Schem.: 7
Pict.: 4
20.Aug.06 10:04

Count of Thanks: 7
Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   6
 
Hello together,

thank you very much for your answers. The using of the word valve in GB is well known.

But in the report, named in the first post, they differentiate between tubes and valves.

For example here:

Table on page 3 of the pdf   
http://www.competition-commission.org.uk/
rep_pub/reports/1950_1959/fulltext/020c03.pdf


I think, they mean radio valves and cathode ray tubes.

Best regards,  Hans-Thomas


Konrad Birkner † 12.08.2014
Konrad Birkner † 12.08.2014
Officer
D  Articles: 2334
Schem.: 700
Pict.: 3656
20.Aug.06 10:43

Count of Thanks: 3
Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   7
 
Gentlemen,
may I draw Your attention to the fact that the famous Bernard B.Babani  used the term
International Radio Tube Encyclopedia.
I don't know if he was British. Anyway the book was written, edited, and printed in UK..

Best regards,
KoBi

This article was edited 20.Aug.06 11:23 by Konrad Birkner † 12.08.2014 .

Mario Candelarezi
 
 
RA  Articles: 24
Schem.: 0
Pict.: 31
20.Aug.06 14:18

Count of Thanks: 5
Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   8
 
Well Hans, cathode ray tubes are calling "tubes" differentiating them from the rest of thermionic valves. Think about that the "tubes" are a class itself and they had an exceptional importance in the composition of the radar in the war times. If I did not read wrong, in the beginnings of BVA only talk about Valves. Mentions about cathode tube are later. In the fortys they was for military use only I guess, before massive existence of tv.

This article was edited 20.Aug.06 15:28 by Mario Candelarezi .

John Turrill
 
 
GB  Articles: 82
Schem.: 18
Pict.: 10
20.Aug.06 17:01

Count of Thanks: 3
Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   9
 
Dear Hans-Thomas,
Quite so, and right through the report, nowhere can be found
where a valve is called a tube; any mention of tubes is confined
to cathode ray tubes, either for oscilloscopes or T/V use.
Interestingly, though, you may note a firm called Electronic
Tubes Ltd., who made valves and tubes, - but their valves were
still called valves.
 
And dear KoBI,
sure enough Mr.Babani published the International Radio Tube
Encyclopedia here, though I think the word "International" is a
clue that preferred international terminology would be used,-
the word valve not being preferred. (and Babani doesn't sound
too English to me!)
Don't forget though, by the same publisher,-"A Comprehensive
Radio Valve Guide", books 1 to 5, aimed a little more at the
British market, and, I think a condensed version of the said
International Encyclopedia.
I do have some GEC data sheets for the "KT" series O/P
valves which occasionally calls them "TUBES", but,  I think,  
exports to America were in mind. (as usual!)
Regards, John.
Hans-Thomas Schmidt
Hans-Thomas Schmidt
Editor
D  Articles: 508
Schem.: 7
Pict.: 4
20.Aug.06 17:58

Count of Thanks: 2
Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   10
 
Dear John,

thank you for the explainations.  In Great Britain you use the term valve, in USA they use tube und here in Germany we tell it Röhre. There are  the same things and its alright.

Babanis International Radio Tube Encyclopedia was firstly published in 1949. There were two later  issues (2. 1954, 3. 1958) which were enlarged with tube supplements Book 1 to Book 4. These books were later separetely edited as Radio Valve Guide. The first three books are identical, the fourth nearly identic and the new fifth book contains modern tubes which are not listed in the Tube Encyclopedia. A sixth book is a cross interchange list.

The International Radio Tube Encyclopedia is one of the best tube data books I know, but it is very hard to get. I have seen it firstly in the Library of the Deutsches Museum in munich and searched it a very long time. After several years I have got it in Canada for a lot of money.

Best regards,  Hans-Thomas

This article was edited 20.Aug.06 18:00 by Hans-Thomas Schmidt .

Konrad Birkner † 12.08.2014
Konrad Birkner † 12.08.2014
Officer
D  Articles: 2334
Schem.: 700
Pict.: 3656
20.Aug.06 19:19

Count of Thanks: 6
Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   11
 
And in France there are neither valves nor tubes or Röhren, only  "Lampes" = Lamps, light bulbs...
Ernst Erb
Ernst Erb
Officer
CH  Articles: 5653
Schem.: 13753
Pict.: 30965
20.Aug.06 19:35

Count of Thanks: 6
Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   12 Lamparas (lamps, light bulbs) is the "public" term for Spanish speaking persons - similar to France. But in the radio field is used Valvulas like Valvole in Italy - which is the same than velves.
Georg Richter
Georg Richter
Editor
D  Articles: 916
Schem.: 86
Pict.: 606
25.Aug.06 22:30

Count of Thanks: 3
Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   13 Maybe 'Deutsche Philips GmbH' did not read the above mentioned encyclopedias, they used the word "Kolben" for ... bulb?



(as advertised in the 'Rundfunk Jahrbuch 1929')

Kind Regards
Georg Richter
Mario Bermejo
Mario Bermejo
 
RA  Articles: 237
Schem.: 211
Pict.: 78
27.Aug.06 07:02

Count of Thanks: 6
Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   14

This is an interesting topic and perhaps it is worth mentioning that in Argentina, we use the word "TUBO" to designate only the CRT or cathode ray tube used in television sets, while for vacuum tubes we use the word "VALVULA"

We do have a lot of british influence and perhaps that's the reason for the similar terminology. The word "lampara" was also used at some point but nowadays it is only used to name light bulbs.

"Radio Valvular" - tube radio or valve radio. ( Argentina)

The word TUBO is used to designate vacuum tubes in Chile and other latinamerican countries, for reasons that are not yet fully investigated :)

"Radio de tubos" (Chile)

Mario

Jacob Roschy
Jacob Roschy
Moderator
D  Articles: 1676
Schem.: 17
Pict.: 68
27.Aug.06 10:02

Count of Thanks: 2
Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   15
 
Hello John,
  
thank you for this interesting links. It may take a long time to read all this stuff !
 
@ all:

At least after WWII even in France it has been introduced to call common electron tubes / valves as "tubes électroniques", but amazingly rectifier tubes were called "valves", as this extract of a French data book clearly shows. Before WWII "lampes" was more common.
 
(biplaque = bi-plate = double-anode)  (redresseur = rectifier )
  
Although in the German language common electron tubes were always called "Röhren" (= tubes), but due to unknown reasons battery rectifier tubes were called "Kolben" (= bulbs) or "Ladekolben" (= charging bulbs).
    
Best Regards,
Jacob Roschÿ

This article was edited 28.Aug.06 08:05 by Jacob Roschy .

Wolfgang Holtmann
Wolfgang Holtmann
Editor
NL  Articles: 876
Schem.: 37
Pict.: 29
27.Aug.06 11:40

Count of Thanks: 6
Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   16

Mr. Roschy wrote:

At least after WWII even in France common electron tubes / valves has been called "tubes électroniques", but amazingly rectifier tubes were called "valves"…..

 

In the German language the translation for Valve is Ventil.

In the world of electronics: current flow in one direction only. And this is exactly the function of a rectifier, as we all know. And who invented (patented) the first rectifier?  Indeed, Ambrose Fleming, an Englishman in 1904!

 

My conclusion: By using the wording “Valves” the British pay tribute to their great native inventor.

Greetings from The Netherlands

 

This article was edited 27.Aug.06 11:55 by Wolfgang Holtmann .

Mark Hippenstiel
Mark Hippenstiel
Editor
D  Articles: 1211
Schem.: 3012
Pict.: 15597
27.Aug.06 16:01

Count of Thanks: 7
Reply  |  You aren't logged in. (Guest)   17
 

Hallo,

noch eine Fundstelle, zu besichtigen im Schaltplan des Desmet 598:

Gruss,
Mark Hippenstiel

  
rmXorg