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Electric Gramophone 2100

Electric Gramophone 2100; His Master's Voice (ID = 1776051) R-Player Electric Gramophone 2100; His Master's Voice (ID = 1776052) R-Player
Electric Gramophone 2100; His Master's Voice (ID = 1776054) R-Player Electric Gramophone 2100; His Master's Voice (ID = 1776056) R-Player
Electric Gramophone 2100; His Master's Voice (ID = 1776057) R-Player Electric Gramophone 2100; His Master's Voice (ID = 1776058) R-Player
Electric Gramophone 2100; His Master's Voice (ID = 1776059) R-Player
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Electric Gramophone 2100; His Master's Voice (ID = 1776051) R-Player
His Master's Voice: Electric Gramophone 2100 [R-Player] ID = 1776051 800x600
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For model Electric Gramophone 2100, His Master's Voice (Masters, HMV, H.M.V., Marconi); Hayes, Middlesex, GB
 
Country:  Great Britain (UK)
Manufacturer / Brand:  His Master's Voice (Masters, HMV, H.M.V., Marconi); Hayes, Middlesex, GB
Year: 1936 ?? Category: Sound/Video Recorder and/or Player
Wave bands - without
Details Record Player (not changer)
Power type and voltage Alternating Current supply (AC) / 100-130; 200-250 Volt
Loudspeaker - For headphones or amp.
Power out
from Radiomuseum.org Model: Electric Gramophone 2100 - His Master's Voice Masters,
Material Wooden case
Shape Tablemodel, Box - most often with Lid (NOT slant panel).
Dimensions (WHD) 380 x 165 x 345 mm / 15 x 6.5 x 13.6 inch
Notes

This record player has a mechanism that resembles the wind up players. It has an automatic felt brake when the record comes to its end.
The motor is connected to the turntable with a worm drive. There is only one speed, 78 rev/minute.
The electromagnetic head needs the standard steel needles used for mechanical players. The impedance is approximately 2500 Ohms.

See also; Columbia Phonograph Co. Inc. Magic Notes 229

Model page created by Nicolaas van Dijk. See "Data change" for further contributors.



All listed radios etc. from His Master's Voice (Masters, HMV, H.M.V., Marconi); Hayes, Middlesex, GB
Here you find 395 models, 283 with images and 237 with schematics for wireless sets etc. In French: TSF for Télégraphie sans fil.



 


Forum contributions about this model
His Master's Voice: Electric Gramophone 2100
Threads: 1 | Posts: 5
Hits: 1295     Replies: 4
hismasters: 2100; Electric Gramophone
Nicolaas van Dijk
26.Jan.15
  1

Hello all

I did upload the model and guessed that the year was 1936. There is a very similar model (If not exactly the same exept the brand) from Columbia, the magic notes 229 as indicated by the administrator, but the year of manufacturing is 1930. Is there a possibility to pinpoint the year of manufacturing a little more accurate?

Kind regards

Nico

 

Michael Watterson
28.Jan.15
  2

Based on the design of my 1935 HMV Radiogram 370 I would have thought both the models mentioned are perhaps 1932 to 1934 era. Indirect heated mains Radios with gram input are from about 1931 in UK.

The 370 page has pictures of the motor interior, which has worm drive and adjustable speed governer.  Its moving iron pickup coil and arm is similar but very high resistance coil, extremely fine wire, about 40,000K! As the moving iron is built in, it does work with a bamboo or thorn stylus or a steel needle. The steel needles are usually single use  but still available.

Of course it might alternately be a cost reduced later version of the turntable. I have a bakelite case HMV with similar style arm and table, but different motor, it's very much later (post 1937 I think), so 1936 isn't impossible either.

Nicolaas van Dijk
28.Jan.15
  3

Thanks a lot for the info Michael.

The model I have does not have a governor. It is a motor with 4 coils and an anchor that seems solid iron or at least, a solid iron sleeve. That makes the motor synchroneous when the anchor magnetises. Perhaps that is the reason that there is no governor needed. So my model may be a little later than your 370 model, but again, just a guess.

Kind regards

Nico

Michael Watterson
28.Jan.15
  4

78 rpm is nominal. In practice maybe 65 to 85 was used? If you load a synchronous motor it "slips". Mine too is synchronous motor, but the adjustment is likely to suit the records, not mains variaton.

In these photos the lever and arm that the brass disc pushes against has been removed. As the disc slides to left it presses more on the arm (with its brake pad). The lever moves the arm position and thus the load point.

The spinning balls are on hinged springs and thus regulate the speed at point set by the moving arm (not fitted)

 

 

Nicolaas van Dijk
28.Jan.15
  5

Hello Michael

A synchroneous motor should not slip until is looses its synchronism, than it becomes an a-synchroneous motor. Therefore it needs a permanent magnet in the rotor, in my model seems done with the iron rotor sleeve that magnetizes and pulls the motor in synchronism. The RPM is 100% synchroneous with the frequency applied upto the torque where it looses. A a-synchroneus motor always slips and the slip is torque dependent. So I think that your model uses a a-synchroneaous motor.

May be interesting to see if there is a patent for the synchroneous motor, can give an idea about the year of the machine

Kind regards

Nico

 

 
His Master's Voice: Electric Gramophone 2100
End of forum contributions about this model

  
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