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Byrd Antarctic Expedition Airplane Receiver

Byrd Antarctic Expedition Airplane Receiver ; National Electric (ID = 1953385) Commercial Re Byrd Antarctic Expedition Airplane Receiver ; National Electric (ID = 1953387) Commercial Re
Byrd Antarctic Expedition Airplane Receiver ; National Electric (ID = 1953391) Commercial Re Byrd Antarctic Expedition Airplane Receiver ; National Electric (ID = 1953394) Commercial Re
Byrd Antarctic Expedition Airplane Receiver ; National Electric (ID = 1953398) Commercial Re Byrd Antarctic Expedition Airplane Receiver ; National Electric (ID = 1953399) Commercial Re
Byrd Antarctic Expedition Airplane Receiver ; National Electric (ID = 1953401) Commercial Re
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Byrd Antarctic Expedition Airplane Receiver ; National Electric (ID = 1953385) Commercial Re
National Electric: Byrd Antarctic Expedition Airplane Receiver [Commercial Re] ID = 1953385 1400x1310
Select picture or schematic to display from thumbnails on the right and click for download.
For model Byrd Antarctic Expedition Airplane Receiver, National Electric Signaling Co. (NESCO) or Supply; Washington, D.C.
 
Country:  United States of America (USA)
Manufacturer / Brand:  National Electric Signaling Co. (NESCO) or Supply; Washington, D.C.
alternative name
 
National Electric Signaling Co. || National Electrical Supply Co.
Year: 1928 Category: Commercial Receiver (may include amateur bands)
Valves / Tubes 4: 215A 215A 215A 215A
Main principle Special principle (see notes)
Wave bands Broadcast and Short Wave (SW).
Details
Power type and voltage Storage and/or dry batteries
Loudspeaker - For headphones or amp.
Power out
from Radiomuseum.org Model: Byrd Antarctic Expedition Airplane Receiver - National Electric Signaling Co
Material Metal case
Shape Miscellaneous shapes - described under notes.
Dimensions (WHD) 12 x 11 x 6 inch / 305 x 279 x 152 mm
Notes

The First Byrd Antarctic Expedition of 1928-1930 brought 14 radio transmitters, 9 transceivers, and 22 receivers to support the Expedition and conduct research. The Expedition resulted in the first aircraft flight over the South Pole in 1929, and this model is the High Frequency (HF) Airplane Radio Receiver used on the aircraft brought to Antarctica. The receivers were designed by Malcolm Hanson, the chief radio engineer of the Expedition, and a Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) radio engineer. These receivers were built by members of the Expedition under the direction of Hanson, from kits of parts made up by the National Electrical Supply Co. (Nesco) of Washington DC. Only 4 of these receivers were built using a super-regenerative circuit with four Western Electric Type 215 “peanut” tubes. Plug-in coils gave the receivers a wavelength range from 17 to 92-meters, and from 500 to 700-meters. They were installed in the Expedition aircraft and also used in the Expedition base radio station (WFA) at Little America Antarctica for reception of the aircraft transmissions. They worked so well, that they were also used frequently for short-wave broadcast reception from the United States during the Expedition.

Model page created by Richard Groshong. See "Data change" for further contributors.



All listed radios etc. from National Electric Signaling Co. (NESCO) or Supply; Washington, D.C.
Here you find 30 models, 28 with images and 2 with schematics for wireless sets etc. In French: TSF for Télégraphie sans fil.




  
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