detrola: Detrola Model 321 Table Radio Value

ID: 484074
This article refers to the model: 321 (Detrola; Detroit (MI))

? detrola: Detrola Model 321 Table Radio Value 
04.Sep.18 00:44
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Michael Boessen (USA)
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Michael Boessen

Hi, All:

Not sure if it is OK to do this, but I presume someone will correct me if I am out of line.  I am restoring a Detrola 321 table radio.  There is one fuzzy black and white photo in Radio Museum.  Other than that, I can't find any examples of this radio being sold in restored condition..  I've looked in Radio Daze,  Stein's and Radio Attic.  Can anyone give me some idea of the value of this set?  I've sold 3 radios recently only to have the buyer tell me after the sale that it was too cheap.

Thanks!

Mike

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detrola: Detrola Model 321 Table Radio Value 
04.Sep.18 15:18
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Rolf Beckers (D)
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Rolf Beckers

Dear Michael,

In general it's the same with every collector’s item: If you find somebody who wants it desperately,

you are lucky. I would estimate the radio between 30 and 70 Dollars.

Regards,

Rolf

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detrola: Detrola Model 321 Table Radio Value 
04.Sep.18 17:14
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Michael Boessen (USA)
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Michael Boessen

Hi, Rolf!

Was your estimate for "as is" or for "restored"?    Here are a couple of photos.  I'm waiting for a tube so I just slipped the chassis in there to take these.  I repaired one tiny chip in the front, one of the speaker screws is reproduction, and I had to make a new plastic dial bezel.  The rest is original and I think I have done a very nice cabinet restoration.

I was hoping to get at least $100 for it.  Maybe not realistic.  The radio was given to me, and I couldn't find a listing for it in any price guide, so I assumed it was rare and would be worth at least that.  Possibly a mistake on my part.  Of course, including labor, you always lose money on these little table radios, but it gives me something to do.

Again, thank you for your time.\

Mike

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detrola: Detrola Model 321 Table Radio Value 
05.Sep.18 09:08
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Rolf Beckers (D)
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Rolf Beckers

Dear Mike,

You may get a $100 if somebody is just hunting for that model. I’ve roundabout 500 radios in my collection, and my experience is that such radios run between 30 and 70 Dollar. The last number might be for the renovated version. You have to see things like this as a hobby that keeps you busy.

Regards,

Rolf

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detrola: Detrola Model 321 Table Radio Value 
05.Sep.18 15:40
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Michael Boessen (USA)
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Michael Boessen

Hi, Again, Rolf!

Thank you for helping me to price my radio.  I really appreciate it.  Your last line is the most important one.   Thank you for reminding me of that.  If I didn't have antique radios to work on, I am fairly sure I would go crazy.  Probably most of the value of the radio is in that statement you made in your post.

Best

Mike

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detrola: Detrola Model 321 Table Radio Value 
05.Sep.18 20:16
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Michael Watterson (IRL)
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The value is unrelated to price obtained. Some quite common radios fetch high prices and some very rare models might go for $15.

The price is whatever you can get. Well described & good photo auctions with sensible shipping options on ebay do far better than dirty, poorly described, bad and insufficient photos, too high a start price or a reserve (at all), or "Collect Only". Completed sale prices on ebay of well described / good photo sets are meaningful. Buy Now, asking prices with no bids or physical auction "guide prices" (rarely are they expert) are meaningless.

It's fashion, not rarity or how much work has been put in.

In the UK & Ireland, Bakelite sells better than wood, even though it was the cheaper option. Only radiograms were large, and they are very hard to sell, as people here don't have the space. Not a problem in South Africa, Australia or USA. The large floor standing sets hardly existed at all in UK & Ireland apart from radiograms. A small Bakelite or "hat box" / picnic battery set was the main and only set for the majority of people in UK & Ireland in 1930s to 1950s. Few had electronic record players or radiograms or deluxe wooden table sets except very well off people till 1960s. Yet the Bush DAC90a and KB Toaster might fetch $90 (they are both REALLY common!) but a lovely wooden model with LW/MW/SW of the same year might only get $20, even if rare. VHF-FM didn't arrive in the UK till 1955, and only duplicated three MW stations. In Ireland in late 1961/early 1962 and only one duplicate station. Unlike Germany with many extra FM stations from 1949. So any sort of 1950s to 1960s valve (tube) set with FM is more valuable, especially with many European AM stations closing (I can only get two, on LW during the day, though very high quality sets can get a 3rd daytime MW station. Still a good few MW AM after dark). Except Early UK models only did up to 101, then later 104. Currently there a good lot of stations 101 to 108. My phone's FM radio using its headphone cable radio can get about 20 FM stations. Another reason to boycott phones with no earphone jack.

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