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grundig: Labeling the Battery Charge Switch

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Forum » Radios and other type of sets (Physics) etc. » MODELS DISPLAYED » grundig: Labeling the Battery Charge Switch
           
Frank Pascale
 
 
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05.Apr.18 02:48

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Hello:

Perhaps one of our German-speaking colleagues can help me with a question about my UKW-Concert Boy 59.   Both plaques were missing from the cabinet, the one that said "GRUNDIG" and the one marking the pushbuttons above.  I was able to fabricate the GRUNDIG one using a Brother labelmaker with a gold on black lettering scheme.  I used expanded type then cut the label down to size with a razor blade against a steel ruler.  After several messy and failed attempts to attach it, I ended up with rubber cement on both the bezel recess, and on the back of the unpeeled label (for stiffness and to level it out).  Any rubber cement that gets up on the label itself rubs off easily after the cement sets.  It looks quite good.

Now to the pushbutton label.  This radio seems to be one sold into the German market.  From the schematics I believe the band buttons should be marked "L" "M" "K" and "U".  What do I mark the charging button?  Battery charge translated to German (by Google) yeilds "akku-ladung".  Was it marked in a shortened version of that?

Small detail, but this restoration has been a delight.  Hope someone can help.

Best,

Frank

 

 

Gerhard Wickern
Gerhard Wickern
 
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05.Apr.18 19:57

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Hello Frank,

if you zoom into the picture with the ID = 1778843, you can read "Laden" under the leftmost button, which means "charge" in german.

 

Herzliche Grüße

Gerhard Wickern

Frank Pascale
 
 
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06.Apr.18 00:25

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Gerhard:

 

Thank you so much for the help.  I'm glad you provided the exact word: in my enlargement of 1778843 I really cannot quite make it out.  

Shortly I'll post my version of the DEAC 3,5 battery, using a D-sized 10.000 mA cell shoehorned into a small wooden box.  I did all my test work with this battery, and did not want to abandon it for a C size cell.

Best,

Frank

 

Frank Pascale
 
 
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11.Apr.18 16:12

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Gerhard:

My earliest Normende radio (about 1966) had a button labled "UKW", and I always assumed this meant "United Kingdom Wavelength", thinking that FM in Europe might have gained a foothold in the UK first.  I have since seen it as "UK-FM" (only reinforcing my thinking), and of course the model Grundig I am working on is model UKW-Concert Boy 59.

But, maybe this is all a bit goofy.  Thinking about your recent translation for me of "charge", could it maybe mean Ultra Short (Kurtz) Wavelength?

What does "UKW" mean?

Best,

Frank

Bernhard Nagel
Bernhard Nagel
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11.Apr.18 17:52

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Hello Frank,

yes, you are right. UKW means Ultrakurzwelle (Ultra Short Wave, or more correct VHF, Very High Frequency). In GB the FM band is designated as VHF.

Bernhard

Frank Pascale
 
 
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11.Apr.18 18:52

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Bernhard:

Thank you.  I am reminded of the quote "...it ain't the things you don't know that gets you into trouble, its the things you think you know that just ain't right".  I think Edwin Armstrong used this expression, but likely it belonged to someone else.

Best,

Frank

  
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