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UKW-Concert-Boy 59

UKW-Concert-Boy 59; Grundig Radio- (ID = 1326037) Radio
UKW-Concert-Boy 59; Grundig Radio- (ID = 2561687) Radio UKW-Concert-Boy 59; Grundig Radio- (ID = 2561688) Radio
UKW-Concert-Boy 59; Grundig Radio- (ID = 318127) Radio UKW-Concert-Boy 59; Grundig Radio- (ID = 318128) Radio
UKW-Concert-Boy 59; Grundig Radio- (ID = 318129) Radio UKW-Concert-Boy 59; Grundig Radio- (ID = 491408) Radio
UKW-Concert-Boy 59; Grundig Radio- (ID = 1020651) Radio UKW-Concert-Boy 59; Grundig Radio- (ID = 1020652) Radio
UKW-Concert-Boy 59; Grundig Radio- (ID = 1334170) Radio UKW-Concert-Boy 59; Grundig Radio- (ID = 1334172) Radio
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UKW-Concert-Boy 59; Grundig Radio- (ID = 2561687) Radio
Grundig Radio-: UKW-Concert-Boy 59 [Radio] ID = 2561687 1400x1453
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For model UKW-Concert-Boy 59, Grundig (Radio-Vertrieb, RVF, Radiowerke)
 
Country:  Germany
Manufacturer / Brand:  Grundig (Radio-Vertrieb, RVF, Radiowerke)
alternative name
 
Grundig Portugal || Grundig USA / Lextronix
Year: 1959/1960 Category: Broadcast Receiver - or past WW2 Tuner
Valves / Tubes 9: DF97 DF97 DK96 DF97 DF97 DF97 DAF96 DL96 EL95
Main principle Superheterodyne (common); ZF/IF 460/10700 kHz
Tuned circuits 8 AM circuit(s)     12 FM circuit(s)
Wave bands Broadcast, Long Wave, Short Wave plus FM or UHF.
Details
Power type and voltage Line / Batteries (any type) / 110; 125; 160; 220 / Deac D3,5 & 90 Volt
Loudspeaker Permanent Magnet Dynamic (PDyn) Loudspeaker (moving coil) - elliptical
Power out 0.15 W (unknown quality)
from Radiomuseum.org Model: UKW-Concert-Boy 59 - Grundig Radio-Vertrieb, RVF,
Material Leather / canvas / plastic - over other material
Shape Portable set > 8 inch (also usable without mains)
Dimensions (WHD) 430 x 250 x 180 mm / 16.9 x 9.8 x 7.1 inch
Notes Ausgangsleistung bei Netzbetrieb: 1,2 W.
Net weight (2.2 lb = 1 kg) 7.8 kg / 17 lb 2.9 oz (17.181 lb)
Price in first year of sale 339.00 DM
Source of data HdB d.Rdf-& Ferns-GrH 1959/60

Model page created by Bernd P. Kieck. See "Data change" for further contributors.



All listed radios etc. from Grundig (Radio-Vertrieb, RVF, Radiowerke)
Here you find 6064 models, 5290 with images and 4093 with schematics for wireless sets etc. In French: TSF for Télégraphie sans fil.



 


Forum contributions about this model
Grundig Radio-: UKW-Concert-Boy 59
Threads: 3 | Posts: 17
Hits: 593     Replies: 5
grundig: Labeling the Battery Charge Switch
Frank Pascale
05.Apr.18
  1

Hello:

Perhaps one of our German-speaking colleagues can help me with a question about my UKW-Concert Boy 59.   Both plaques were missing from the cabinet, the one that said "GRUNDIG" and the one marking the pushbuttons above.  I was able to fabricate the GRUNDIG one using a Brother labelmaker with a gold on black lettering scheme.  I used expanded type then cut the label down to size with a razor blade against a steel ruler.  After several messy and failed attempts to attach it, I ended up with rubber cement on both the bezel recess, and on the back of the unpeeled label (for stiffness and to level it out).  Any rubber cement that gets up on the label itself rubs off easily after the cement sets.  It looks quite good.

Now to the pushbutton label.  This radio seems to be one sold into the German market.  From the schematics I believe the band buttons should be marked "L" "M" "K" and "U".  What do I mark the charging button?  Battery charge translated to German (by Google) yeilds "akku-ladung".  Was it marked in a shortened version of that?

Small detail, but this restoration has been a delight.  Hope someone can help.

Best,

Frank

 

 

Gerhard Wickern
05.Apr.18
  2

Hello Frank,

if you zoom into the picture with the ID = 1778843, you can read "Laden" under the leftmost button, which means "charge" in german.

 

Herzliche Grüße

Gerhard Wickern

Frank Pascale
06.Apr.18
  3

Gerhard:

 

Thank you so much for the help.  I'm glad you provided the exact word: in my enlargement of 1778843 I really cannot quite make it out.  

Shortly I'll post my version of the DEAC 3,5 battery, using a D-sized 10.000 mA cell shoehorned into a small wooden box.  I did all my test work with this battery, and did not want to abandon it for a C size cell.

Best,

Frank

 

Frank Pascale
11.Apr.18
  4

Gerhard:

My earliest Normende radio (about 1966) had a button labled "UKW", and I always assumed this meant "United Kingdom Wavelength", thinking that FM in Europe might have gained a foothold in the UK first.  I have since seen it as "UK-FM" (only reinforcing my thinking), and of course the model Grundig I am working on is model UKW-Concert Boy 59.

But, maybe this is all a bit goofy.  Thinking about your recent translation for me of "charge", could it maybe mean Ultra Short (Kurtz) Wavelength?

What does "UKW" mean?

Best,

Frank

Bernhard Nagel
11.Apr.18
  5

Hello Frank,

yes, you are right. UKW means Ultrakurzwelle (Ultra Short Wave, or more correct VHF, Very High Frequency). In GB the FM band is designated as VHF.

Bernhard

Frank Pascale
11.Apr.18
  6

Bernhard:

Thank you.  I am reminded of the quote "...it ain't the things you don't know that gets you into trouble, its the things you think you know that just ain't right".  I think Edwin Armstrong used this expression, but likely it belonged to someone else.

Best,

Frank

 
Hits: 910     Replies: 9
grundig: What is a "Monozelle" ?
Frank Pascale
03.Feb.18
  1

My Grundig UKW-Concert Boy 59 seems to have once had a DEAC 3.5 ah cell after the rectifier and 35 ohm dropping resistor in the filament circuit.  The battery itself is gone, but the corrosion damage suggests it was once there.  Previoulsy, I had restored a 1955 Telefunken which had a similar arrangement.  It seems that the presence of these rechargable batteries act as a excellent voltage regulator for that sensitive 1.4 volt filament circuit.  I observed this over a wide range of input voltage with the Telefunken.

My question concerns a notation on the Concert-Boy schematic, following the DEAC battery, that has two identical parallel plates (that is, not a long one indicating positive and not a short one indicating negative like a standard battery) deployed between the 1.35 volt positive buss and ground.  Between those plates is the word "Monozelle".  

Simply looking up "Monozelle" only gives pictures of single battery cells.  I simply cannot figure what is intended to be here.  The radio itself seems to have a metal bracket attached to the chassis that looks like it could bear against the negative side of a battery, and some sort of retaining clip several inches above.  There is some corrosion damage, so even this is a bit unclear.

So what is this missing component, called "Monozelle" in the circuit diagram?

Best,

Frank

 

 

Eilert Menke
03.Feb.18
  2

"Monozelle" means simply a primary 1,5 volts "D-Cell", see please here

Frank Pascale
03.Feb.18
  3

Thank you.  That fits what I found, but I can't quite understand why it is needed if the DEAC 3,5 battery preceeds it.  At 1.5 volts, it should back-discharge into the DEAC battery when the radio is off, attempting to keep it charged to about 1.4 volt.  When the radio is on battery, it should help supply the filaments along with the DEAC battery, but what is the advantage considering there is a 3500 maH battery behind it?  And when the radio is Mains powered, it will try to charge both the DEAC battery and the 1.5 volt battery; driving the voltage to 1.5 or a bit more, assuming it was originally a carbon-zinc Monozelle.  So I remain a bit puzzled, but you have at least confirmed the meaning of Monozelle.  Again, thanks.

Rüdiger Walz
03.Feb.18
  4

Dear Frank,

the different cells are not used all together. DEAC cell or "Monozelle".

Best regrads

Michael Watterson
03.Feb.18
  5

The Philips sets also relied on the DEAC for 1.35V regulation. Without it the filament voltage is excessive. However the running time on the DEAC battery is poor, maybe 1/3 to 1/4 of an Alkaline D size cell. The Monozelle (D cell also called U2 in UK) is for added running time during portable use as the HT pack lasts maybe 4x to 6x longer.  On the Philips sets it is essentially in parallel, so must not be left in as the DEAC would eventually discharge it and cause it to leak if the set was left in battery mode (power cable docked on the Philips models).

I'm not sure of the Grundig wiring details, but I'd be surprised if it is much different. I think the mains/battery switch disconnects the monozelle (= single cell), often a D size on many sets world wide from 1941. Mostly it was the larger USA sets and UK models that didn't use D cells, but combo packs or specialist LT packs.

You can use an Alkaline cell (gives nearly x2 life and less prone to leakage if left in and in battery mode).

Frank Pascale
03.Feb.18
  6

OK, this helps unwind the mystery.  Thank you.

Frank Pascale
03.Feb.18
  7

Michael:

In this radio, there does not appear to be any mechanism for disconnection:  the batteries seem hard-wired in parallel.   For this radio, Rudiger may be correct, that is, it is the DEAC or the Monozelle.  But your explanation makes complete sense if there is a way to disconnect.

This leads me to another thought.  In the restoration, it may make sense to use a modern NiCad only (say 10,000 maH) rather than an alkaline D cell.  My experience with my Telefunken leads me to believe the regulation of a NiCad is very good, and may be better than that provided by an alkaline D cell (although I made no tests with an alkaline cell under these circumstances).  I am worried about the 8 old, filament-voltage-sensitive tubes, which will be hard and expensive to replace.  The NiCad should level off at about 1.4 to 1.45 when on AC, and this should be just under the 1.5 volts maximum for these tubes.  On the downside, these tubes seem unhappy with 1.2 volts as the AC cord is disconnected and the voltage slides down, never really reaching the capacity of the battery.  In the Telefunken I notice markedly decreased audio output and increased distortion.

So, do you have experience with the behavior of a 1.5 volt alkaline cell under AC operation?

I'd like to hear your thoughts and those of Rudiger and your other colleagues, and I really appreciate the conversation.

Best,

Frank

Michael Watterson
03.Feb.18
  8

The primary cells must not ever be used on mains operation on the LT supply. They can explode if charged and the voltage on an Alkaline cell would rise to a little over 1.6V so any use of a primary cell, (Zinc Carbon, Zinc Chloride or Alkaline Manganese) can only be when the radio is on battery only.

I use a C size 4000mAH NiMH to replace the DEAC, I cut a case from coffee can and put the C cell inside. I print a label. The D size cells with 10000mAH are only online (the local shop versions are just C cells in a D cell case, 4000mAH) and it's better to stick to close to original specification.

An actual NiCd would be better as the NiMH has a slightly higher voltage on charge, but on the other hand the main part of discharge is nearly 0.5V more.

The tubes SHOULD all work on 1.2V. The worst case is the frequency changer which may stop oscillating, but originally the circuit should have worked to 1.1V which is the Zinc Carbon endpoint chosen by designers. On motors and lamps, the running time assumes a 0.9V end point. The design of 6V, 9V and 12V transistor sets assumes a 0.9V per cell endpoin. Also most layer 90V HT packs radio design assume 60V or even  55V end point which is 1V or less per cell. Below 1.1V the Zinc Carbon capacity falls off a cliff!

See this thread about the DEAC and circuit on a Philips

 

See the comments on the D6 model

Frank Pascale
03.Feb.18
  9

Michael:

Thank you for the explicit warning against attempting to recharge primary batteries.  I have never done this for the reasons you explained, but I realize in speculating about the possibilites with this radio a risky message may have inadvertently been sent.  

I like your DEAC "can" and the rechargable battery inside and the fancy label outside.  As I do better with wood than metal, I think I'll make a small wooden box to hold the battery.  I may need to revisit my work on filament voltage, as the logic you present makes a lot of sense.

Great fun this litle project.  Thanks again.

Best,

Frank

Michael Watterson
03.Feb.18
  10

The can is only scissors and a coffee tin! A few solder tacks. The battery might get too warm in a nice wooden sleeve. I do use wooden innards and card outers for working replica battery packs that are not rechargeable.

 

 
Hits: 2661     Replies: 0
grundig: 59; UKW-Concert-Boy, Restauration
Gerhard Heigl
16.May.07
  1

UKW-Concert-Boy 59

Der Concert-Boy von Grundig ist ein wuchtiger Portable der andere Grossportables im Vergleich zierlich erscheinen lässt. Von der Bauform her, ein typisches Gerät der 50er Jahre. Ausreichende Lautstärke bei Netzbetrieb durch eine zusätzliche Endröhre (EL95). Sehr gute Empfangseigenschaften auf UKW, sogar ohne ausgefahrene Teleskopantennen.

Zustand beim Kauf: Das Radio funktioniert auf UKW, LW, KW. Auf Mittelwelle kein Empfang. Tonqualität etwas leise und auch verzerrt. Das Radio ist komplett, der Gehäuseüberzug unbeschädigt aber fleckig. Die Messingleisten dunkel angelaufen, die Vergoldungen an der Skalenblende sowie der Schrift, auch am Rollbalken, fast nicht mehr vorhanden. Am meisten stören mich die dunklen Flecken am Gehäuseüberzug, das Radio wirkt dadurch vergammelt.

 vor der Restauration

Restauration und Reparatur: Das Radio wurde komplett zerlegt.

Reihenfolge Ausbau: Beide Drähte der seitlichen Antennenbuchse ablöten, Chassis, beide Teleskopantennen, Skalenrahmen, Schallwand mit Lautsprecher, Rollbalken – der Rollbalken kann mit gefühlvoller Gewaltanwendung sprossenweise (Kunststoffstäbe) aus der Führungsnut herausgedrückt werden. Nun kann der Griff abmontiert werden. Zusammenbau in umgekehrter Reihenfolge. Die Zierleisten wurden nicht abgenommen. Sie wurden mit Metallpolierpaste auf Hochglanz gebracht. Dadurch verfärbte sich der Gehäuseüberzug im Bereich der Zierleisten schwarz. Nach der Polierarbeit wurde das Gehäuse mit heissem Wasser und Feinscheuermittel gründlich gereinigt. Schmutz und die schwarzen Polier-Verfärbungen waren leicht zu entfernen. Was jedoch blieb, waren die dunklen Flecken. Diese Flecken mussten weg, das Gehäuse muss gespritzt werden. Alle Zierleisten und Buchseneinfassungen mit Klebeband und Zeitungspapier abdecken. Das Gehäuse und der Griff wurden mit einem passenden Farbton (matt) aus der Spraydose sparsam gespritzt, die Struktur der Oberfläche soll erhalten bleiben.

Während das Gehäuse trocknet, wird das Chassis untersucht und allfällige Reparaturen vorgenommen. Eine falsche Netzsicherung wird ausgetauscht, der DEAC-Akku (D3,5) wird ausgebaut, gereinigt, die beschädigte Papierbanderole abgeschabt und durch eine Kopie ersetzt. Der Akku wieder eingebaut, aber nicht angeschlossen, weil er defekt ist. Zur Heizungsstabilisierung werden statt dessen 2 Si-Dioden (1N40xx) in Flussrichtung eingebaut und der Elko C57 (500µF) durch einen Elko mit 4700µF ersetzt (siehe auch hier). Danach unbedingt kontrollieren, ob die Heizspannung der D-Röhren unter 1,5V bleibt. Alle verdächtige Kondensatoren (Wima-Bonbons, Ero und Konsorten) wurden mit dem Isotest geprüft (Werte bis unter 2MΩ wurden gemessen) und ersetzt. Kratzende Potis und das Tastenaggregat wurden mit Cockpitspray von Sonax! behandelt. Die Ferritantenne ist mit Gummiringen fixiert, sie wurde vermutlich beim Versand aus der Halterung gerissen. 3 Drähte einer Spule sind dadurch abgerissen. Ich kann nicht rekonstruieren wo sie hingehören. Vielleicht funktioniert deswegen der MW-Empfang nicht.

Nun werden noch die Vergoldungen der Skalenblende und des Rollbalkens (Schrift) erneuert. Handelsübliche Filzstifte sind dazu nicht sehr geeignet. Ich habe es mit den alten (nicht mehr erhältlichen?) Standardgraph-Federn versucht, es funktioniert sehr gut.

 Gefüllt werden sie mit der Farbe aus den Filzstiften. Goldlack aus der Dose ist für diese Federn auch nicht geeignet, er verstopft zu oft. Die Federn, weil aus Metall, können bedenkenlos mit allen Lösungsmitteln (Nitro, Aceton, Terpentin) gereinigt werden.

Noch etwas zum Gehäuselack: nach dem Trocknen ist mir aufgefallen, dass die Oberfläche etwas klebrig bleibt. Dieser Zustand kann über Wochen andauern. Eventuell werden durch den Lack (Lösungsmittel) Stoffe aus dem Überzug gelöst, die diese Klebrigkeit verursachen. Vielleicht wäre wasserlöslicher Acryllack besser geeignet.

 
Grundig Radio-: UKW-Concert-Boy 59
End of forum contributions about this model

  
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