radiomuseum.org

 
Please click your language flag. Bitte Sprachflagge klicken.

Electronics

A McGraw-Hill Publication
English | Professional Journal
 
Author Editor
Keith Henney, from 1938 on: Donald Fink, from 1953 on: W.W. MacDonald, from 1964 on: Lewis H. Young
Publisher ISBN
Mc Graw-Hill Publishing Company Inc., United States of America (USA)
New York
Tenth Ave. at 36th St.
Date of issue / Date of first publication Periodicity
April 1930 - 1995 / April 1930 monthly
Format Pages
DIN A4 Portrait
Print Type Type
b+w with cover in color Professional Journal
Short Description

Electronics war ein Engineering Journal, welches die weit gespreizten Aktivitäten auf dem Feld der Elektronik zusammenfasste, wissenschaftliche und industrielle Fortschritte dokumentierte und praktisch verwertbare Informationen zusammenstellte.
Neben redaktionellen Beiträgen fanden sich auch Rubriken wie
Neues aus der Industrie
Neues aus der Grundlagenforschung, Patente im Feld der Elektronik, Jede Menge Werbung
Im Laufe der Zeit wurden die Rubriken erweitert:
Neue Produkte, Literatur, Produktionstechniken
Electrons at work (“Elektronen bei der Arbeit“) = Applikationen Rubrik


Electronics has been an engineering journal that will gather together these widespread activities; chronicle scientific and industrial advances abroad and here, and provide practical usable information which can be put to work. Besides editorial contributions there have been also following categories: News from Industry, News from the electronic Field, Electronic Patents, a large amount of Ads; more categories appeared later: New Products, Literature, Production techniques, Electrons at work
Description
Created by: Franz Harder (22.Nov.19) available by: Achim Dassow
Click here for the 9 models documented in this literature, i.a.
1930
 
 
 

April

Vol. 1
No. 1

May

Vol. 1
No. 2

June

Vol. 1
No. 3

July

Vol. 1
No. 4

August

Vol. 1
No. 5

September

Vol. 1
No. 6

October

Vol. 1
No. 7

November

Vol. 1
No. 8

December

Vol. 1
No. 9

1931

January

Vol. 2
No. 1

February

Vol. 2
No. 2

March

Vol. 2
No. 3

April

Vol. 2
No. 4

May

Vol. 2
No. 5

June

Vol. 2
No. 6

July

Vol. 2
No. 7

August

Vol. 2
No. 8

September

Vol. 2
No. 9

October

Vol. 2
No. 10

November

Vol. 2
No. 11

December

Vol. 2
No. 12

1932

January

Vol. 3
No. 1

February

Vol. 3
No. 2

March

Vol. 3
No. 3

April

Vol. 3
No. 4

May

Vol. 3
No. 5

June

Vol. 3
No. 6

July

Vol. 3
No. 7

August

Vol. 3
No. 8

September

Vol. 3
No. 9

October

Vol. 3
No. 10

November

Vol. 3
No. 11

December

Vol. 3
No. 12

1933

Attachments

Currently no attachments available.


Forum contributions about this literature
Electronics
Threads: 2 | Posts: 2
Hits: 127     Replies: 0
New: Electronics, A McGraw-Hill Publication (Start 1930)
Achim Dassow
25.Nov.19
  1

Dear Members and Visitors of Radiomuseum,

In view of having aquired a larger number of volumes of the well known “Electronics“ Magazine i would like to present this source of Information to all members and visitors of Radiomuseum too.

That is why i have begun to scan and insert Front Covers as well as Lists of Contents to the Literature Finder. This Project will take a lot of time, so i'm able to present further Volumes only step by step. For this i'm asking for patience if some delay will happen.
Unfortunately not in every bound Volume the Front Covers have been included, so that instead the first inner page (after the ad pages) has to be a substitute.
Despite this i think the magazine will still be of interest, at least because of the containing Index per distribution.

The leading editorial to the first distribution of April, 1930 has been written by:

  • O.H. Caldwell, former Federal Radio Commissioner
  • Franklin S. Irby, Ph. D.
  • Keith Henney, M.A., also known by his later published Books
  • Lee DeForest, Ph.D. , Inventor of the three electrode tube

The editors have presented timely messages from the following seven great pioneers and leaders who laid the foundations of the electron tube:
Thomas A. Edison

  • Dr. Lee DeForest
  • Prof. J. Ambrose Fleming, Inventor of the Rectifier Tube
  • Dr. R.A. Millikan, from Caltech Institute
  • H.P. Davis, President of Westinghouse Electric Co.
  • Dr. W.R. Whitney, Vice President of General electric Co., Director Research Laboratory
  • Dr. Frank B. Jewett, President of Bell Telephone Laboratories

Besides editorial contributions there have been also following categories:
News from the Industry
News from the electronic Field
Patents in the field of Electronics
A large amount of Ads (in later, much bigger Volumes partly no longer included)

later on more categories appeared like:

New Products
Literature
Production techniques
Electrons at work (Applications Section)

And here is the editorial of the first distribution of the Electronics Magazine, April, 1930:

NEARLY fifty years ago Edison made a discovery now recognized as the most epochal in all his eventful career. Working on his incandescent lamp, he found a faint stream of electricity from the hot filament, flowing across the vacuum.

There the basic phenomenon of electronics stood revealed. But the great inventor was busy with many problems. And so, for a generation, the famous "Edison effect" remained a mere scientific curiosity. Finally, Fleming in England and DeForest in American harnessed this feeble electron action and put it to work-Fleming in his rectifying valve ; DeForest in his revolutionizing three-electrode tube whose "grid" control opened up new worlds of possibilities in communication.

The way once pointed, inventors, physicists and engineers rushed in, until today a far-Hung army numbering thousands of workers is engaged in all the diverse fields of electronic applications, in laboratories around the world.

ALREADY billion-dollar industries are built upon the vacuum tube-in telephony, in radio, in talking pictures, and in power applications. Electronics revolutionized the first three. And in the power field it is now affording an entirely new engineering approach to electrical problems of every kind. For although the electrical engineering of the past was built almost wholly upon the single principle of electro magnetic induction, the electrical designer of today finds he now has a second string to his bow electronics-and that in electronic apparatus he commands a medium
paralleling magnetic-induction in importance, and its equal in wide adaptability, whether for control or for heavy-duty uses.

All of these diverse applications of the electron tube will, of course, further expand and multiply. And a thousand
new uses are coming in increasing volume. The engineering complexity of the situation grows. Specialists are working intensely in their own fields. New developments are coming from unexpected quarters. Chemistry and physics continually uncover new electronic methods and uses. One industry after another provides new ingenuities which can be used elsewhere.

FOR this vital, pulsing electronic art a clearinghouse is needed-an engineering journal that Will gather together these widespread activities; chronicle scientific and industrial advances abroad and here, and provide practical usable information which can be put to work. Such a journal must have scientific vision to look above and beyond the present; it must be courageous and devoted in its stand for progress and for expanding applications.

And it must be independent in its editorial and publishing administration, giving due regard to the rights of established groups which have pioneered along the electronic path and prospered, and also to the rights and opportunities deserved by those independent inventors and developers who will help make the next decade even more brilliant and productive than the past. In short,
Electronics must be a forum for discussion of all points of view-it must serve as a camp-fire around which all may gather for counsel and for exchange of the best thought of the electronic industries.

The art of the electron tubes goes forward to great and greater achievements. To the engineers and executives in all the ramified branches of electronics, the editors and publishers pledge a service worthy of this field of unparalleled opportunity.

Electronics“ has been published between 1930 and 1995
Executive Editors have been:

  1. 1930-1937 Keith Henney
  2. 1938-1952 Donald Fink
  3. 1953-1963 W.W. MacDonald
  4. 1964-19?? Lewis H. Young

Electronics was published by McGraw-Hill until 1988, when it was sold to the Dutch company VNU, later then to Penton Publishing

Beside the scanned Titlepage there is also the corresponding content Page included.
To all readers i wish they'll enjoy the stuff.
Further Volumes will follow step by step.

Regards
Achim

 
Hits: 211     Replies: 0
Neu: Electronics, A McGraw-Hill Publication (Start 1930)
Achim Dassow
23.Nov.19
  1

Liebe Radiogemeinde,

angesichts des Erwerbs einer grossen Zahl von Jahrgängen des weltweit bekannten Magazins “Electronics“ möchte ich auch allen Mitgliedern und Besuchern diese Informationsquelle nicht vorenthalten.

Inzwischen habe ich damit begonnen, die Titelseiten und Inhalte der “Electronics“ von Ausgabe 1, 1930 an in den Literaturfinder einzustellen. Dieses Projekt nimmt relativ viel Zeit in Anspruch, so dass ich nur nach und nach die ganzen Ausgaben dokumentieren kann. Daher bitte ich auch um Geduld, wenn es mal etwas länger dauert.
Leider ist bei manchen der späteren Jahrgänge nicht immer die Titelseite mit eingebunden worden, so dass zum Teil erst die erste Innenseite nach der Werbung bzw. die Übersicht der jeweiligen Ausgabe dafür herhalten muss.
Dennoch gehe ich davon aus, dass das Magazin auf einiges Interesse stossen wird, nicht zuletzt auch wegen der jeweiligen Übersicht über die darin veröffentlichten Beiträge.



Der ersten Ausgabe vom April 1930 vorangestellt ist ein Editorial, das ich für Euch ins Deutsche übersetzt habe. Der Text folgt weiter unten.
Die Editoren der ersten Stunde sind:

  • O.H. Caldwell, früherer Bundes Radio Bevollmächtigter
  • Franklin S. Irby, Ph. D.
  • Keith Henney, M.A., auch bekannt durch später veröffentlichte Bücher
  • Lee DeForest, Ph.D. , Erfinder der Dreielektroden Röhre

Von Zeit zu Zeit sollten durch die Redakteure auch Beiträge folgender Autoren veröffentlicht werden:

  • Thomas A. Edison
  • Dr. Lee DeForest
  • Prof. J. Ambrose Fleming, Erfinder der Gleichrichterröhre
  • Dr. R.A. Millikan, vom Caltech Institute
  • H.P. Davis, Präsident der Westinghouse Electric Co.
  • Dr. W.R. Whitney, Vize Präsident der General electric Co., Forschungsdirektor
  • Dr. Frank B. Jewett, Präsident der Bell Telephone Laboratories

Neben redaktionellen Beiträgen fanden sich auch Rubriken wie
Neues aus der Industrie
Neues aus der Grundlagenforschung
Patente im Feld der Elektronik
Jede Menge Werbung (in späteren, voluminöseren Jahrgängen teils nicht mehr mit eingebunden)
Im Laufe der Zeit wurden die Rubriken erweitert:

Neue Produkte
Literatur
Produktionstechniken
Electrons at work (“Elektronen bei der Arbeit“) = Applikationen Rubrik


Nun zum Editorial der Ausgabe 1, 1930:

Beinahe 50 Jahre ist es her, dass Edison eine Erfindung machte, die heute als die wohl epochalste in seiner gesamten Karriere angesehen wird. Während seiner Arbeit an Glühlampen entdeckte er einen feinen Strom, aus der heissen Glühwendel stammend, der das Lampenvakuum durchquerte.

Damit war das Grundprinzip heutiger Elektronik entdeckt. Aber der grosse Erfinder war viel zu sehr mit anderen Problemen beschäftigt, um weiter daran zu forschen. Und so blieb der famose “Edison Effekt“ eine Generation lang nicht mehr als eine wissenschaftliche Kuriosität. Letztendlich blieb die Verwertung und Umsetzung dieser Elektronenbewegung in einen Gleichrichter Fleming vorbehalten und die Anwendung als Dreielektrodenröhre, die eine neue Welt der Möglichkeiten in der Kommunikation eröffnete, wurde zum revolutionierenden Werk DeForests.

Der einmal aufgezeigte Weg lockte immer mehr Erfinder Physiker und Ingenieure an, die heute inzwischen wie eine grosse Armee Werktätiger in Laboratorien über die ganze Welt verteilt, an verschiedensten elektronischen Applikationen arbeiten.

Inzwischen entwickelte sich rund um die Elektronenröhre ein Milliardengeschäft, in der Telefonie, in der Radio- und Kinotechnik und in der Energietechnik. In den ersten drei Feldern kam es gar zur Revolution. Und in der Energietechnik erschliesst sich nun ein völlig neuer Entwicklungsansatz für die Lösung elektrischer Probleme aller Art. Obwohl elektrisches Engineering der Vergangenheit fast ausschliesslich auf der Anwendung elektromagnetischer Prinzipien basierte, können heute Ingenieure auf ein zweites, in der Bedeutung und in der Anwendbarkeit zunehmendes Medium zurückgreifen, ob nun für Steurungszwecke oder auch für das Handling schwerer Lasten.

All diese verschiedenen Applikationen der Elektronenröhre werden sich in Zukunft erweitern und sich gar multiplizieren. Und einige tausend neuer Anwendungen werden in zunehmender Menge entstehen. Die Komplexität neuer Entwicklungen wird wachsen. Immer mehr Spezialisten werden in ihren eigenen Gebieten arbeiten. Neue Entwicklungen werden aus unerwarteten Feldern kommen. Chemie und Physik entdecken ständig neue Methoden und Anwendungen. Eine Industrie nach der anderen wird neue Erfindungen für den Gebrauch in vielen Bereichen etablieren.

Für diese frische, pulsierende neue Kunst wird ein Forum benötigt, ein Engineering Journal, welches die weit gespreizten Aktivitäten auf diesem Feld zusammenfasst, wissenschaftliche und industrielle Fortschritte dokumentiert und praktisch verwertbare Informationen zusammenstellt. Solch ein Magazin sollte mutig und fortschritts- bzw. anwendungsorientiert wissenschaftliche Visionen über die Gegenwart bis in die Zukunft hinein vermitteln.

Und es sollte in redaktioneller und wirtschaftlicher Hinsicht unabhängig sein, die Rechte Etablierter, die auf dem elektronischen Weg Pionierarbeit leisteten, berücksichtigen. Und die Rechte und Möglichkeiten unabhängiger Erfinder und Entwickler respektieren, die daran arbeiten das nächste Jahrzehnt noch erfolgreicher und produktiver zu machen. Kurz gesagt, “Electronics“ sollte ein Forum für Diskussionen aus allen Perspektiven sein, es sollte ein Lagerfeuer für alle in der elektronischen Industrie sein, die sich versammeln um sich zu beraten und die besten Gedanken auszutauschen.

Die Elektronenröhren – Kunst entwickelt sich hin zu grossen und grösseren Fortschritten. Für Ingenieure und Geschäftsführer in allen sich verzweigenden Bereichen der Elektronik versprechen die Redakteure und Publizierer einen wertvollen Service in diesem Feld der bislang nicht da gewesenen Möglichkeiten.

“Electronics“ wurde publiziert zwischen 1930 und 1995
Die verantwortlichen Redakteure waren:

  1. 1930-1937 Keith Henney
  2. 1938-1952 Donald Fink
  3. 1953-1963 W.W. MacDonald
  4. 1964-19?? Lewis H. Young


Ursprüngliche Adresse:

Mc Graw-Hill Publishing Company Inc., USA
New York
Tenth Ave. at 36th St.

Im Oktober 1931 bezog man das neue Firmengebäude in der 330 West 42nd Street, das auch die Frontseite der Dezember-Ausgabe der Electronics zierte.
(Siehe rechts)
Dieses Gebäude wurde aber nur bis 1972 genutzt, als das neue Gebäude bezogen wurde.

Anschliessend wurde das alte Gebäude verkauft und wurde 1989 zum historischen Denkmal erklärt.


Electronics wurde bis 1988 von McGraw-Hill herausgegeben, danach wurde das Magazin an VNU in Holland, später dann an Penton Publishing weiterverkauft.



Neben den jeweiligen Titelseiten sind auch die Inhaltsverzeichnisse gescant worden.
Ich wünsche allen Interessierten frohes Stöbern.
Weitere Jahrgänge werden nach und nach folgen.

Gruß
Achim

 

 
Electronics
End of forum contributions about this literature

  
rmXorg