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History of the manufacturer  

Raytheon Mfg. Co.; Cambridge, MA

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Name: Raytheon Mfg. Co.; Cambridge, MA    (USA)  
Abbreviation: raytheon
Products: Model types Tube manufacturer
Summary:

Raytheon Mfg. Co.
Cambridge, Mass.

Raytheon Production Corp.
Newton, Mass. (Tyne, "Saga of the vacuum tube" page 361)

The company produced radios and tubes, licensed by RCA. They also made the standard range of radio panel/dial lamps.

Just about three months after Regency TR-1, Raytheon distributed around June 1955 the second (or first really usable) transistor radio, 8TP, actually 8TP-1, 8TP-2, 8TP-3 and 8TP-4.

History:
The American Appliance Company was formed in 1922. Founders were Laurence K Marshall, Charles G Smith and Vannevar Bush. These three men had a common interest in refrigeration technology but were not successful in their venture. They changed their focus to radio engineering and developed a gas rectifier tube for converting alternating current to direct current. They subsequently formed the Raytheon Manufacturing Company in October 1925 and in the next three years made a range of tubes for battery eliminators and power supplies. These were the B, BA, BH, BR and R. Next was a range of 17 known and common receiving tubes with the type number prefixes Ray-X, Ray-V and Ray. These tubes adopted the patented "four pillar" "X" shaped glass element mounting, which was claimed to have extra strength for the metal components of the assembly. This mounting was continued until at least 1934.
In 1928 Raytheon sued the QRS Music Company for patent infringement and as a result was able to take over the smaller company. On June 1st 1929 the National Carbon Company (Eveready batteries) entered into an agreement with Raytheon to be the sole distributor of Raytheon tubes and the brand name was changed to Eveready Raytheon. Factories were enlarged to cope with the additional tube manufacture and production was enormously increased. The prefix of the tube type numbers was changed to ER and over the next few years additional tubes were made, bringing the total of types to about 50. No exact date has been found but the agreement appears to have become inactive between May and August 1933. From then on the brand reverted to Raytheon and ER was dropped from the type number. (Thus the ER2A5 became the 2A5 etc.) There were over 90 receiving tubes made up to the mid 1930's, almost all with the "four pillar" mounting. The 1934 Radio Laboratories catalogue (Kansas City, Missouri) lists about 70 of these. The four pillar mounting appears to have been discontinued between 1935 and 1936. A small number of older Raytheon tubes have been found with the regular "pinch" element mounting. The National Carbon Co allowed the agreement to lapse in 1938.
Raytheon made a wide range of industrial and military tubes as well as those for amateur radio stations. Tube prefixes for these were CK or RK and the numbers were only used by Raytheon. The Raytheon Production Corporation, with facilities at Newton, Massachusetts made some of these. The parent company purchased the Acme Delta Company, makers of transformers, auto electrics and power units, in 1933. Following the development in the UK of the magnetron tube, the US Government approached some of the larger tube manufacturers to produce magnetrons in large quantities for marine, ground and aviation radar systems. With the help of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Raytheon was able to supply over four fifths of the military requirements. Raytheon was also instrumental in developing submarine detector systems using radar. Following the War, Raytheon turned their magnetron research expertise to food cooking. In 1967 the company began selling counter top microwave ovens with the brand name Amana.
From as early as 1945 the company had been experimenting with guidance systems for missiles and by the time f the Korean War had developed the "Lark" missile. Others were to follow and the Patriot missile was used in the Gulf War. In 1980 the company acquired the Beech Aircraft Corp and in 1993 Corporate Jets (Hawker) from British Aerospace. The company sold off Amana Refrigeration and other non military concerns over a period and has become more orientated to military defence activities.


Some models:
Country Year Name 1st Tube Notes
USA  53 CR-41A Ch= 4D16-A 12BE6  According to SAMS Photofact 212-5 from August 1953 the chassis 4D16-A was first used fo... 
USA  53 CR-42A Ch= 4D16-A 12BE6  According to SAMS Photofact 212-5 from August 1953 the chassis 4D16-A was first used fo... 
USA  53 CR-43A Ch= 4D16-A 12BE6  According to SAMS Photofact 212-5 from August 1953 the chassis 4D16-A was first used fo... 
USA  53 PR-51A Ch= 4P12A 1R5  Selenium Rectifier. 
USA  53 R-51A Ch= 5D157-A 12BE6  Colors available: Mahogany and White. 
USA  53 R-52A Ch= 5D157-A 12BE6  Colors available: Mahogany and White. 
USA  55 Transistor Radio 8TP1 Ch= 8RT1 [tan] CK761  Just a few weeks after Regency (IDEA) has launched the first transistor radio, Regency ... 
USA  56 T-100-1 Ch= 4RT1 2N252  This first pocket transistor radio from Raytheon Mfg. Co., the radio model T-100, came in ... 
USA  56 T-100-2 Ch= 4RT1 2N252  This first pocket transistor radio from Raytheon Mfg. Co., the radio model T-100, came in ... 
USA  56 T-100-4 Ch= 4RT1 2N252  This first pocket transistor radio from Raytheon Mfg. Co., the radio model T-100, came in ... 
USA  56 T-100-5 Ch= 4RT1 2N252  This first pocket transistor radio from Raytheon Mfg. Co., the radio model T-100, came in ... 
USA  55 C-50B Ch= 4D16-A 12BE6  Raytheon used its chassis 4D16-A for three Alarm-Clock Radio models with the same cabin... 

[rmxhdet-en]

Further details for this manufacturer by the members (rmfiorg):

Raytheon 1950s magazine adtbn_raytheon.png
Radio Broadcast, May 1926, p. 65tbn_usa_raytheon.jpg
tbn_usa_raytheon_advertise_1954.jpg
tbn_raytheon_09_1927_ad1.jpg
Popular Science December 1925tbn_b_raytheon.png
Raytheon logo from January 1973 QSTtbn_raytheon_logo.jpg
tbn_usa_raytheon_radio_tubes.jpg
Popular Radio December 1925tbn_raytheon_b_pr1225_prom.jpg
Popular Science October 1927tbn_raytheon_ps1027.png
Popular Science December 1927tbn_raytheon_r_ps1227.png
QST magazine January 1928tbn_raytheon_qst_128.png
QST magazine September 1928tbn_raytheon_qst_928.png
Radio Engineering February 1929tbn_raytheon_re229.png
Popular Science June 1929tbn_raytheon_ps629.png
Citizens Radio Call Book, Spring 1927tbn_raytheon_crcb_spring_1927.png
Citizens Radio Call Book Spring 1927tbn_raytheon_crcb_spring_1927~~1.png
Radio Engineering June 1928tbn_raytheon_kino_lamp_and_photo_cell_re628.png
Modern Radio Handbook II Australia - undatedtbn_raytheon_ad_modern_radio_handbook_ii.png

Forum contributions about this manufacturer/brand
Raytheon Mfg. Co.; Cambridge, MA
Threads: 1 | Posts: 1
Hits: 1851     Replies: 0
Raytheion Mfg Co.; Cambridge, USA
Fin Stewart
23.Sep.14
  1

The company was listed as an RCA licensee by the Wall Street Journal April 8th, 1930, in their "Broad Street Gossip" Column

 
Raytheon Mfg. Co.; Cambridge, MA
End of forum contributions about this manufacturer/brand

  
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