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ARTS&P - Australian Radio Technical Services and Patents Co. Ltd.; Sydney, NSW

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Name: ARTS&P - Australian Radio Technical Services and Patents Co. Ltd.; Sydney, NSW    (AUS)  
Abbreviation: artsp
Summary:

Australian Radio Technical Services and Patents Co. Ltd. (ARTS&P)
47 York Street, Sydney, NSW

This company was formed to take over all the patent rights claimed in relation to sets and parts made by A.W.A, Standard Telephones, Ltd., and Phillips. Ltd. [1]

By 1927 the manufacture of radio receivers in Australia and New Zealand was subject to over 2000 patents, registered in the country of origin and also in Australia and New Zealand. 

With so many patent holders a solution had to be sought to manage the conflicts arising and an Australian Royal Commission was instigated.

An article titled Wireless. The Patent Situation. Present Complications” by N.M. Goddard in The Sydney Morning Herald of January 31, 1934, explains the Patent situation in early 1934.[2] 

ARTS&P License No.1 was issued in December 1933 and published in the Radio Trade Annual 1934, page 75.

In April 1934 representatives of radio patent owners assembled in Sydney to discuss the possibility of forming a joint company to collect royalties in uniform method from manufactures of radio sets. This resulted in The Radio Royalty Pool Plan.[3]

On April 4 1934 Hazeltine joined the ARTS&P [4] and by April 24 the group consisted of 18 companies.[5].


The licensing system was used in Australia and New Zealand.

Founded: 1933
Closed: 1985
Documents about this manufacturer/brand
  The Patent Situation-Goddard NM, SMH Jan 31, 1934 74 KB
History:

To show compliance to the License each licensed radio manufactured was fitted with a small sticker attached to the back of the chassis. Each label had a serial number and a letter to indicate the year of manufacture. The royalties paid were based on the number of cathode–anode electron streams in the set, and this is represented by a number in the top left of the label. The label wording for each country either refers to the Commonwealth of Australia or the Dominion of New Zealand. The 1934 label was plastic riveted to the chassis in Australia and New Zealand was white paper glued to the chassis. In later years, New Zealand radios used the Australian label with another label added stating “Patent licence extended for use in the Dominion of New Zealand”.

Australian labels

Date

Colour

Material

Mounting

Prefix 

1934   

White

Plastic

Stapled to cabinet or riveted to chassis

A

1935-1936

Pale blue

Plastic

Stapled to cabinet or riveted to chassis

B

1936   

Pale blue

Decal

Transfer on chassis

C

1937   

Pale blue

Decal

Transfer on chassis

D

1938   

Pale blue

Decal

Transfer on chassis

E

1939-1940   

Pale blue

Decal

Transfer on chassis

F

1940-1941   

Pale blue

Decal

Transfer on chassis

G

1941 on

Pale blue

Decal

Transfer on chassis

None

From late 1941 on, a pale blue/green label was used with a serial number and no letter prefix.

Known example photos are displayed in Further Details below with links to models.

[I] 1934, Astor Caliph PZ.

[II] 1935, Emmco Model M455.

[III] 1936, AWA Empire State Model 32

[IV] 1937, Aristone, General Purpose Radio.

 [V] 1937, Aristone, General Purpose Radio.

[VI] 1939/40, Airzone Model 5071

[VII] 1940/41, Stromberg-Carlson Model M31  Mantel

[VIII] 1941 late, Stromberg-Carlson Model M31 Table

[IX] 1946, Airway, Model 1075

[X] 1954, Tecnico, Model TO7

[XI] In the late1950’s known examples have a “B” in a darker blue as a watermark on the label. Photo example is for a 1958 HMV Model 64-52.

[XII] Television labels in the 50’s and early 60’s have the letters “TV” stamped across the label. Photo example is for a 1968, HMV Model V6-BJ television.

[XIII] 1960 AWA Radiola 6 transistor, Model B11. Note “8” in the top left-hand corner for a six transistor, two diode, radio.

New Zealand Labels

 

Date

Colour

Material

Mounting

Prefix

1934   

White

Paper

Glued to chassis

None

1935-1936

Pale Blue

Decal

Transfer on chassis

B

1936   

Pale Blue

Decal

Transfer on chassis

C

1937   

Pale Blue

Decal

Transfer on chassis

D

1938   

Pale Blue

Decal

Transfer on chassis

E

1939-1940   

Pale Blue

Decal

Transfer on chassis

F

1940-1941   

Pale Blue

Decal

Transfer on chassis

G

1942-1946

Pale Blue

Decal

Transfer on chassis

H

*1946-1950

Dark Green, Red letters

Decal

Transfer on chassis

I

*1950-1951

Orange, Dark Green letters

Decal

Transfer on chassis

I

1952-1960’s

Small pale Blue, Dark Blue letters

Decal

Transfer on chassis

None

*The dark Green and Orange label dates overlap.

Links to Models with labels;

1938 Columbus, Model 35.
1947 Philco Model 200.
1951 Akrad, Regent 6PE.
1954 Philco, Model 804.

ARTS&P  TECHNICAL BULLETIN.

The company published Technical Bulletins with circuits and helpful design hints for its licensees and included reviews of contemporary wireless magazines.

In November 1935 The company was granted an experimental Television transmitter license.[6]

By the 1950’s, most of the original radio patents necessitating the ARTS&P had expired. The advent of transistors, FM and television bought a new wave of patents but by the 1960’s the number of manufactures had reduced and production was by large manufacturers. These manufactures obtained their

[1] The Advertiser (SA) Feb 7, 1934, Page 19.
[2] The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW) Jan 31, 1934, Page 6.
[3] The Herald ( Vic.) Apr 3, 1934, Page 8.
[4] The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW) Apr 18, 1934, page 18.
[5] The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW) Apr 24, 1934, page 8.
[6] Shepparton Advertiser (Vic.) Nov 12, 1935, Page 5.
[7] Commonwealth of Australia Gazette. General (National)  Apr 23, 1985 [Issue No.G16]  Page 1644.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This manufacturer was suggested by Gary Cowans.


[rmxhdet-en]

Further details for this manufacturer by the members (rmfiorg):

[1] Company registered. The Advertiser (SA) Feb 7, 1934, Page 19.tbn_aus_artsp_1_the_age_vic_aug_31_1933_page_6.jpg
[3] The Radio Royalty Pool Plan. The Herald ( Vic.) Apr 3, 1934, Page 8.tbn_aus_artsp_3_the_herald_vic._apr_3_1934_page_8.jpg
[4] On April 4 1934 Hazeltine joined the ARTS&P The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW) Apr 18, 1934, page 18.tbn_aus_artsp_4_the_sydney_morning_herald_nsw_apr_18_1934_page_18.jpg
[5] By April 24 the group consisted of 18 companies. The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW) Apr 24, 1934, page 8.tbn_aus_artsp_5_the_sydney_morning_herald_nsw_apr_24_1934_page_8..jpg
[6] In November 1935 the company was granted an experimental television transmitter license. Shepparton Advertiser (Vic.) Nov 12, 1935, Page 5.tbn_aus_artsp_6_shepparton_advertiser_vic._nov_12_1935_page..jpg
[7] The company was liquidated in April 1985. Commonwealth of Australia Gazette. General (National) Apr 23, 1985 [Issue No.G16] Page 1644.tbn_aus_artsp_7_commonwealth_of_australia_gazette._apr_23_1985_page_1644.jpg
Articale from Radio Trade Annual, 1935 Page 17, on Progress of Radio in Australia during 1933.tbn_aus_artsp_progress_of_radio_in_australia_during_1933.jpg
ARTS&P License No. 1. Page 1. From the Radio Trade Annual 1934, Page 75.tbn_aus_artsp_license_1_page_1.jpg
ARTS&P License No. 1. Page 2. From the Radio Trade Annual 1934, Page 76.tbn_aus_artsp_license_1_page_2.jpg
ARTS&P License No. 1. Page 1. From the Radio Trade Annual 1934, Page 77.tbn_aus_artsp_license_1_page_3.jpg
[i] 1934 Label. White, Plastic label, prefixed with the letter “A”, riveted to rear of chassis or stapled to woodwork inside some consoles. This is a stapled example from an Astor Caliph PZ.tbn_aus_artsp_1934.jpg
[ii]1935 - 1936 Label. Pale blue, Plastic label, prefixed with the letter “B”, riveted to rear of chassis. This example from a EMMCO M455.tbn_aus_artsp_1935_36.jpg
[iii] 1936, AWA, Empire State Model 32.tbn_aus_artsp_iii_1937.jpg
[iv] 1937, Aristone, General Purpose Radio.tbn_aus_artsp_iv_1937.jpg
[v] 1937, From a Aristone, General Purpose Radio.tbn_aus_artss_p_v_1938.jpg
[vi] 1939/40, from a Airzone Model 5071.tbn_aus_artsp_vi_1939_40.jpg
[vii] 1940/41, from a Stromberg-Carlson Model M31 Manteltbn_aus_artsp_vii_1940_41.jpg
[viii] 1941 late,from a Stromberg-Carlson Model M31 Tabletbn_aus_artsp_viii_1941_late.jpg
[ix] 1946, from a Airway, Model 1075tbn_aus_artsp_ix_1946.jpg
[x] 1954, from a Tecnico, Model TO7.tbn_aus_artsp_x_1954.jpg
[xi] Late 1950’s known examples have a “B” in a darker blue as a watermark on the label. Photo example is for a 1958 HMV Model 64-52.tbn_aus_artsp_xi_1958.jpg
[xii] Television labels in the 50’s and early 60’s have the letters “TV” stamped across the label. Photo example is for a 1968, HMV Model V6-BJ television.2tbn_aus_artsp_1968_hmv_v6_bj_tv.jpg
[xiii] 1960 AWA Radiola 6 transistor, Model B11. Note “8” in the top left-hand corner for a six transistor, two diode, radiotbn_aus_artsp_xiii_1960.jpg

  
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