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Arbeitsfront-Empfänger DAF1011

Arbeitsfront-Empfänger DAF1011; Gemeinschaftserzeugn (ID = 22363) Radio
 
Arbeitsfront-Empfänger DAF1011; Gemeinschaftserzeugn (ID = 4528) Radio
 
Arbeitsfront-Empfänger DAF1011; Gemeinschaftserzeugn (ID = 307500) Radio
 
Arbeitsfront-Empfänger DAF1011; Gemeinschaftserzeugn (ID = 360073) Radio
 
Arbeitsfront-Empfänger DAF1011; Gemeinschaftserzeugn (ID = 360074) Radio
 
Arbeitsfront-Empfänger DAF1011; Gemeinschaftserzeugn (ID = 717789) Radio
 
Arbeitsfront-Empfänger DAF1011; Gemeinschaftserzeugn (ID = 717788) Radio
 
Arbeitsfront-Empfänger DAF1011; Gemeinschaftserzeugn (ID = 8185) Radio
 
Arbeitsfront-Empfänger DAF1011; Gemeinschaftserzeugn (ID = 307499) Radio
 
Arbeitsfront-Empfänger DAF1011; Gemeinschaftserzeugn (ID = 25336) Radio
Arbeitsfront-Empfänger DAF1011; Gemeinschaftserzeugn (ID = 1621) Radio Arbeitsfront-Empfänger DAF1011; Gemeinschaftserzeugn (ID = 1847940) Radio
Arbeitsfront-Empfänger DAF1011; Gemeinschaftserzeugn (ID = 51993) Radio Arbeitsfront-Empfänger DAF1011; Gemeinschaftserzeugn (ID = 2225614) Radio
Utilisez la barre de défilement rouge.
Arbeitsfront-Empfänger DAF1011; Gemeinschaftserzeugn (ID = 1621) Radio
Gemeinschaftserzeugn: Arbeitsfront-Empfänger DAF1011 [Radio] ID = 1621 673x525
Sélectionnez une image/schéma pour afficher des vignettes sur la droite et cliquez pour télécharger.
Pour le modèle Arbeitsfront-Empfänger DAF1011, Gemeinschaftserzeugnisse Vorkrieg
 
Pays:  Allemagne
Fabricant / Marque:  Gemeinschaftserzeugnisse Vorkrieg
Année: 1935–1939 perfect model Catégorie: Radio - ou tuner d'après la guerre 1939-45
Lampes / Tubes 5: AF3 AF7 AC2 RE614 AZ1
Principe général Récepteur TRF - par réaction (régénératif); 1 Spécial; 2 Etage(s) BF
Circuits accordés 3 Circuits MA (AM)
Gammes d'ondes PO et GO
Particularités
Tension / type courant Alimentation Courant Alternatif (CA) / 110-240 Volt
Haut-parleur - Ce modèle nécessite des HP externes
Puissance de sortie
De Radiomuseum.org Modèle: Arbeitsfront-Empfänger DAF1011 - Gemeinschaftserzeugnisse
Matière Boitier métallique
Forme Modèle de table profil bas (grand modèle).
Dimensions (LHP) 397 x 255 x 237 mm / 15.6 x 10 x 9.3 inch
Remarques Arbeitsfront-Empfänger. Wellenbereiche: 198...555 m; 910...2000 m. Ausgang für Lautsprecher: 200 bis 6000 Ohm. Leistungsbedarf bei 220 Volt: 60 Watt. Beleuchtungslampe: 4,5 V/0,3 A. Tonblende-Regler.
Nach Anfangspreis (1936/37) kostete das Gerät 1938/39 nur noch RM 270.- (kpl.m.Röhren).
Eine Auflistung aller deutschen Hersteller ist hier zu finden.
Poids net 12.8 kg / 28 lb 3.1 oz (28.194 lb)
Prix de mise sur le marché 295.00 RM !
Source extérieure E. Erb 3-907007-36-0
Source HandB.d.d.Rundfunk-Handels 1936/37 / Radiokatalog Band 2, Ernst Erb
Source du schéma Schenk-Regelien und FS-Bestückungstab.
Littérature Funkgeschichte der GFGF (9495)
Index des illustrations Das Modell ist im «Radiokatalog» (Erb) abgebildet.


Tous les appareils de Gemeinschaftserzeugnisse Vorkrieg
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Contributions du forum pour ce modèle
Gemeinschaftserzeugn: Arbeitsfront-Empfänger DAF1011
Discussions: 10 | Publications: 35
Vus: 1789     Répondre: 0
gemeinsch: DAF1011 Lack aus Baumarkt
Ralf Keil
23.Nov.09
  1

Die Lackierung eines DAF kann durchaus mit Hammerschlaglack aus dem Baumarkt erfolgen. Er muss dabei jedoch dünn aufgetragen werden, so bleibt die Kräusellackstruktur erhalten. Das Ergebnis sieht allerdings etwas heller aus als im Original. Möglicherweise ist aber der Altlack in der Regel auch verschmutzt bzw. nachgedunkelt. Stellen, die keinen Originallack und deshalb auch keine Struktur mehr hatten, wurden glatt belassen, was kaum auffällt. Siehe auch hier.

 

Der nachlackierte DAF, deutlich ist die Kräusellackstruktur zu sehen:

Viel Spass bein Restaurieren!

Ralf Keil

 
Vus: 1882     Répondre: 1
gemeinsch: DAF1011 (DAF 1011); What is "Pruefspannung"?
Michele Denber
30.Aug.09
  1

I'm selecting new capacitors to replace the block electrolytics in my DAF.  One of the schematics I have lists two separate voltage ratings for them: Arbeitspannung (which I assume means "working voltage") and "Pruefspannung" which is much higher.  For example, the 0.5 uF preamp coupling capacitor no. 97 on the AC2 plate has a listed working voltage of 400 v. but a Pruefspannung of 1500 v.!  I can't even find capacitors rated that high.  What does this number mean?  I have a 0.47 uF capacitor rated 630 v.  Is there some reason I should not use that?  Thanks!

Torbjörn Forsman
30.Aug.09
  2

 

"Pruefspannung" means test voltage. For paper capacitors of old days, the factory test was always performed at a much higher voltage than the capacitor's rated operating voltage. At least in Europe, it was common practice to mark the capacitors with the test voltage and then it was up to the radio design engineer to apply a suitable de-rating. When using modern polyester or polypropylene capacitors, there is no need for de-rating, so 400 V or 630 V capacitors can be used in all positions in old radios. The only exception is RFI filtering capacitors across the mains input or across the anode voltage winding of the mains transformer, those should be replaced by capacitors designed for such use. Such capacitors are marked X1 or X2 and have a lot of approval marks from various safety authorities. Capacitors for connection from either side of the mains to ground should be marked Y1 or Y2, this is also valid for, for instance, the protection capacitors for the antenna and ground terminals of transformerless AC/DC sets.

 
Vus: 2886     Répondre: 1
gemeinsch: DAF1011 (DAF 1011); Farbe und deren Technik
Klaus Bayer
12.Aug.09
  1

Hallo,

habe einen DAF1011, dessen Farbe noch echt sein dürfte. Leider müßte diese ausgebessert werden.

Hierzu habe ich einen Bekannten, der Modellbauer ist, befragt. Er meinte, die sehr rauhe Struktur der Farbe ist nicht einfach herzustellen. Selbst die Farbe ist seiner Meinung nach zweischichtig ausgeführt.

Bevor er jetzt mit Marmorlack und ähnlichem Experimentiert, würde mich interessieren, wie der Farbaufbau tatsächlich gemacht wurde und evtl. gibt es ja auch Tipps aus der Neuzeit.

Einfach silberne Farbe auftragen ist aus meiner Sicht nicht korrekt.

Viele Grüße

Klaus Bayer

Pièces jointes

Wolfgang Bauer
12.Aug.09
  2

Vielleicht hilft dieser Beitrag weiter ==> Strukturlack.

MfG. WB.

 
Vus: 2266     Répondre: 3
gemeinsch: DAF1011 (DAF 1011); Block cap wire question
Michele Denber
01.Dec.08
  1

Sorry for the blank message.  The Editor was not giving me a text window.  I thought maybe it was waiting for me to hit Return in the Title field, but all that did was post a blank message.  I don't know why it was doing that.  Now it seems to be working.

Anyway, I am now replacing the second block capacitor in my DAF-1011, part no. 6766, the 1.5uF/4uF block located on the bottom of the chassis in the middle.  This block has three leads: black, yellow, and green.  The black lead is ground.  I'm now stuck figuring out where the remaining two go.  The green lead measures lower, so I'm calling that the 1.5 uF wire, making the yellow wire the 4 uF section.  The green wire connects to a 400K resistor as you can see here:

But I only see one 1.5 uF electrolytic capacitor in the schematic (coming off the plate of the RE614, below) and it connects to a 0.1M resistor! 

The 4 uF side does connect to a resistor, but it's shown as a 40K.

  In my radio, you can clearly see this is a 400K.  So now I'm really wondering what's going on here.  Is my assumption of which wire is which wrong?  I know the capacitor is bad, so perhaps it's turning up bad readings on my meter.  Or maybe the schematic is wrong?  Or maybe I'm looking at the wrong parts in the schematic?  Can someone please help?  Thanks / danke sehr!

Hans M. Knoll
02.Dec.08
  2

Hello Ms Denber.

I see your question and would like to say my opinion with regard to that.
I think, you are on the wrong way.
Read my drawing and examine your statement for this purpose.

Greetings of Hans M. Knoll

Michele Denber
02.Dec.08
  3

Thank you so much, Herr Knoll!  I was indeed simply looking in the wrong place.  Part of the problem is that the 400K resistor is labeled "0.4M" in my schematic and is not placed near the capacitor.  I saw it and just went right by.

Your schematic is much better.  Is it available on the DAF model page?  There are several different schematics there but I didn't recognize this one.  I actually have a copy of the parts list (Ersatzteil-Stueckliste) with the numbers corresponding to that schematic, but I don't have the schematic itself.

Anyway, you really cleared up this mystery for me.  It's all perfectly obvious now :-)  Thanks again!

Hans M. Knoll
02.Dec.08
  4

 

Hello Ms Denber.

Good if it has helped you.


No, there is not this diagram here. I bought it, in order to show it in public with 100 %, I do not have the copyright.

I think you should use this,    there also the dimensions of the components stand.

I think thats a good version from german "Funkschau" a prof. Publication for electronics.


With the Telefunken- Version, you must always work with the part listings ( you have this!)

I you want  for private use, tomorrow I can send you a copy via mail.

regrads Hans M. Knoll

 

.
 

 
Vus: 1921     Répondre: 5
gemeinsch: DAF1011 (DAF 1011); Block capacitor s
Michele Denber
18.Sep.08
  1

Now that I have removed the insides from my block capacitor, I need to figure out the best way to put the new ones inside the empty shell of the original.  There's plenty of room since the old one measures  3.5" x 2.5" x 4" (9 x 6.5 x 10.4 cm).  The new capacitors only measure 1 5/8" x 1" x  1 7/16" (4 x 2.7 x 3.5 cm) each.  Does anyone have a good idea of how to secure the two new capacitors?  I could:

1. glue them to the inside of the original shell,

2. make a bracket to fit inside the shell and mount them to that,

3. just let them lie loose,

4. melt new wax and embed them in that, or perhaps something better that I have not thought of.  Has anyone else done this?  What would you recommend?  Any help would be appreciated.  Thanks / danke / merci.

Thomas Albrecht
18.Sep.08
  2

Michele,

As you point out, there are a variety of ways to solve this problem, and I'm sure you will find that different people have different preferences.

One method I use for mechanically mounting capacitors is to use silicone caulk.  It can easily fill large gaps, so it is quite suitable for attaching cylindrical objects (e.g., modern tubular capacitor) to flat surfaces (e.g., inside of a block capacitor housing).  It is also a good electrical insulator (priovided you let it cure first).  Since it's flexible, it will not let go with thermal cycling or age.  It adheres well to virtually any surface.

Typical products would be GE Silicone or RTV Silicon caulk for general purpose household applications.

This approach doesn't necessarily look very pretty, but for areas that are not easily visible, it is an effective and reliable solution.

Best regards,

Tom

Michele Denber
19.Sep.08
  3

Wow, that sounds like the best idea yet.  I even have some RTV handy but it's normally  for automotive use so I hadn't thought to try it for this purpose.  But now that you mention it, this does seem like the ideal solution to this problem.  Thanks so much for the suggestion!  Now I can proceed with my DAF restoration.  Thanks!

Emilio Ciardiello
19.Sep.08
  4

Dear Michele,


A good alternate filler for your job is a polyurethane foam. It is light, cheap and can be easily removed if you need to replace some components again. A thin layer of liquid compound is enough, since it rapidly increases its volume while curing and fills the empty spaces. After curing, the excess foam can easily be cut away. Its surface can be also lacquered to the wanted colour.

Best regards,

Emilio

Rüdiger Walz
20.Sep.08
  5

Dear Michele,

I fix new capaciators with hot melt glue. It can easily be adjusted or changed. Example see here.

Best regards

Rüdiger Walz

Michele Denber
21.Sep.08
  6

Grazie to Emilio and danke sehr to Ruediger for two more excellent suggestions.  Those are some very impressive photos.  I can only hope my restoration comes out as good.  Thanks to everyone for taking the time to reply to my question.

                         - Michele

 

 
Vus: 4747     Répondre: 10
gemeinsch: DAF1011 (DAF 1011);
Michele Denber
12.Jan.08
  1 I have just successfully removed the guts from one of the block capacitors on the DAF-1011 so that I could hide modern capacitors inside.  The problem is how to remove the hard tar-like substance that fills the box.  I removed the bottom bakelite plate and then put the capacitor in a toaster oven at 400 deg.  After 15 minutes, the material started to drip from the bottom into the tray.  Tilting the oven slightly helps the matreial to flow away.  After 25 minutes most of it had slowy flowed out like lava.  I removed the capacitor and then used a knife to remove the capacitor innards.  They came right out.  Neither th silver paint on the case nor any of the ink markings were harmed.  If you do this, do NOT use your kitchen oven.  The tar smokes and smells horrible.  I did this outdoors.  Use a toaster oven you don't plan to use again for food.  The only problem I had was that one side of the metal case came apart but this can easily be glued back on.  Other than that, it worked fine.  Nothing caught fire.  And I saved the tar.  I could probably pour it back in around the new capacitors but I don't think I'll bother with that.
Detlef Boeder
13.Jan.08
  2

Hi Michele,

when the tar smokes, the temperature is too high. Pls test it again with a lower temp. But the situation differs from condenser manufacturer to condenser manufacturer. I mount condenser blocs headfirst. So the "lava" floats perfectly out in a old metal cake box and not over the cabinet. But i work with a old kitchen oven in the cellar. I could never work in our kitchen oven with tar, because my girlfriend would eject me ;-)

Regards

DeBo

 

Michele Denber
14.Jan.08
  3

Hi Detlef,

Well, the smoke was actually kind of gray.  I saw another post somewhere where the recommended temperature was 350 deg. F (177 deg. C).  However, that was taking too much time and I'm not known for my patience.  Even at 400 deg. F (204 deg. C) it still took 25 minutes to get the tar to melt.  And even at 350 I got smoke.  At least I did not get fire :-)

I have two more capacitors to melt in my DAF-1011.  I will try them at 350.  They are smaller so it may work OK that way.

On a related note, is there any point in keeping the original capacitors that I extracted from the can?  Do they have any historical value?  Do they affect the value of my radio?  Is there any point in saving the resolidified lump of tar?  Danke sehr1

Detlef Boeder
15.Jan.08
  4

Hello Michele,

well, i think 350C° are heavy! 200C° up to 250 C° are o.k. Please spend enough time, because the power supply condenser bloc is a big lazy mass. About your other questions:

 "On a related note, is there any point in keeping the original capacitors that I extracted from the can? "

No, i don't think. No historical value.

"Do they affect the value of my radio?"

Standpoint electrical: The value from the condensers in these positions are not critical. Example: 1µF you can change it into 820nF or 1,2µF. 0,5µF in 470nF, 560 or 680nF (IEC international standard). But please the first charging condenser 8µF in the power supply after the rectifier not higher! The absolute value is "Cmax" in the datasheet. The second 8µF after the choke should be 8µF, but the radio works also with for example 6µF.

Standpoint optical: This is my personal opinion. I mean, it is nice and the collectors are proud when the radio plays after the restoration, but the work should be professionel, reversible and invisible. Make a photo before you start your restoration and collect original replaced parts - for example small condensers and resistors in a plastic bag inside the cabinet. If you sell your radio, the next owner can restore it into the original state. So the value from the radio keeps in time.

"Is there any point in saving the resolidified lump of tar?"

Do not eat ;-) Keep out from children. Its trash. I use new material in a form of repair material from DIY-markets for roof repair to fill out the condenser cabinets.

Kind regards,

Detlef

 

 

Rüdiger Walz
16.Jan.08
  5
Dear Michele,
there are several methods of restoring a block capacitor. It depends on the intention and the restoration philosophy of the owner of the set. Enjoying the optimal performance of a historical set is very often the dream and the target of the owner. To achieve it without destroying the historical value of the set is always difficult. Every change should be ideally reversible.
 
Detlef already stated that removed parts of a radio should be stored in the set as a minimum measure to keep the value of the set. I agree to him: To my opinion this is not necessary with the contents of a block condenser.
 
I personally put only new condensers into the old can if the can is destroyed by the old condensers. Old capacitors mostly fail due to water take up by the paraffin wax. The wax is hygroscopic and because of that the resistance of the condenser insulation is reduced. Very seldom the condensers fail due to spark and short circuit. Due to the reduced resistance the condensers became hot and increased their volume. So in many cases the tin can of the block condenser is destroyed.
The German Post Office used following method in the 1940ies to restore capacitors with a resistance out of specification (because no spare parts were available after the war), which left the capacitor absolutely original.
First remove the bakelite cover and unsolder the wires. Second I use a heat gun to remove the bituminous tar which is much more efficient than the method using an oven. Then the condenser is put into a pot with molten paraffin wax (about 80 °C) and slowly heated up to 120 °C. (check temperature !) Evolving bubbles show that the water which is absorbed by the wax is evaporating. After about 30 min the water is completely evaporated and the block condenser is cooled down while replenishing molten wax. The wax reduces its volume significantly while cooling down. Now you can apply new tar and close the bakelite cover again. For the next decades the condenser will work again. This method can also be used at small capacitors.
 
If the tin can of the condenser is burst it is not possible to put in the old condensers again. You have to hide modern capacitors inside. If you use a heat gun you will be much faster but take care of the silver colour of the tin can. Use a big screw like a corkscrew to remove the old capacitors. The risk to bend the tin can is much lower than to use a knife. How to equip an old block condenser with new capacitors you will see some pictures under Mende 180W the next days.
 
I always kept the bituminous tar to seal the enclosure of small axial capacitors. It looks absolutely original.
Rüdiger Walz
 
 
Konrad Birkner † 12.08.2014
16.Jan.08
  6

This is a good method if You are careful:

1)  Never put anything in the white wax if it is above 95°C. Water will vaporize immediately , the piece can burst, and the liquid paraffin will splash and can do real bad harm.
When I was an undergraduate I jobbed in a telephon central office. New dial selectors had to be wired. The multi-wire cables (63 wires) used wrapped paper insulation, which after stripping and harness forming had to be cooked in paraffin. You had to be extremely careful not to import any water, not even one drop. It happened once (I was not an eyewitness, but I saw the consequences) that such a harness cable end was obviously wet (nobody knew why) and dunking it into the hot stuff about 2 litres from a total of 6 were spouted around... the worker luckily wore eyeglasses, so "only" his cheeks, nose, forehead,  chin and one ear got burned. To remove the undesired hair-spray was an extra task...

2) Heat up slowly ! The white wax has to melt inside, before it reaches 100°C. This allows bubbles to escape on the spot before steam pressure builds up and discharges suddenly.

3) Control the temperature ! Overheated wax tends to self-ignition.

Be careful !
Good luck !

PS: For emptying block capacitors I got best results using a hot air gun, too. The tin boxes are often soldered, which is easily redone.

Michele Denber
16.Jan.08
  7

Danke sehr to everyone who replied to my post.  To re-emphasize, I was heating at 400 deg. Fahrenheit, not 400 deg. Centigrade.  I appreciate Detlef's comments on restoration philosophy.  Since I do not personally know anyone else restoring these radios, I'm not really familiar with how other people go about it.  I want to restore my radio to playing condition while keeping it safe and with minimum possible disruption to its original state.  I know some people even avoid cleaning the chassis to preserve the original 60 year old dust, but I think that's going a bit too far :-)

I also appreciate the electrical considerations.  The capacitor I'm working on is indeed the power supply filter block and my replacement capacitors are rated at 8.2 uF.  This should be well within the tolerences of the originals.  I'm curious about the suggestion that 6 uF would be OK because I've always heard that one can safely go up in capacitance but not down.

Thanks also to Ruediger about block capacitor restoration.  I thought about using a heat gun but it seemed like it might be too messy and I was worried about uneven heating.  Fortunately, my can withstood the toaster oven at 400 deg. F.  The paint was unharmed and the ink markings were also fine.  The solder did let go on one side but as Konrad mentions, this is easily fixed.  Ruediger also mentions saving the tar to refill small axial capacitors.  This is an excellent idea and I can use it for my DKE-38 capacitors which are almost always bad.  Great idea about using a corkscrew as a puller too.  I'll try that on the next one.

Finally, I had thought about trying to reform the capacitor but I decided it would be more prudent to replace it with modern components, especially given its position in the radio.  I do not want to risk damaging the power transformer or the rectifier tube.  I know that the old capacitor was very leaky and the radio was drawing far too much power.

Ernst Erb
16.Jan.08
  8

Dear Michele
Having lesser capacity will cause more hum but no other problem, having higher capacity can harm the rectifier tube. If you know the data of your rectifier tube you can work out what the maximum is but you might have to consider the 60 Hz instead of 50.

For such a set best is to stay with the original value and your 8.2 is really fine. Then you get also (almost) the same performance as when it was new. It is not a HiFi gear ;-)

The rectifier has to work for a smaller resistance if you go up with the capacity and has therefore to deliver a much higher power (Amps) resulting in shorter life up to sudden "death" depending on the value.

Michele Denber
18.Jan.08
  9 Thank you for the comments, Ernst.  It turns out to be not so easy to find exactly 8 uF in a high voltage capacitor.  8.2 was the closest I could find and that is within 3% of the original value.  I don't think the original tolerences were that tight.  I could not even find any electrolytic capacitor at all that was this close.  I note that the voltage on the original is 1500 V!  My replacements are film capacitors (from Mouser Electronics, see http://www.epcos.com/inf/20/20/ds/b32674_8.pdf) that are rated Vop = 800 VDC, VR = 630 VDC, Vp = 950 VDC, and Vrms = 350 VAC.  Is there any reason they should not work?  Is there something more suitable?  Danke.
Bernhard Nagel
18.Jan.08
  10
Hi Michele,

the choosen Epcos (formerly Siemens) MKP capacitors would be a very good solution for your replacing job. Even the mentioned voltage rating is more than enough for this application and gives you operational safety for your set.

The usual tolerances of old (historical) block capacitors was about 10...20% when they was new produced. So the usage of 8,2µF instead of originally 8µF is absolutely irrelevant.

Good luck!

Bernhard Nagel
Michele Denber
18.Jan.08
  11

Hi Bernhard,

Thank you very much for confirming my choice of capacitors.  I have simliar capacitors for the other two blocks.  I want to proceed very carefully with this radio.  I have worked on DKE's and VE-301's before, but never a DAF.  I had a hard time finding one so I want to do a good job on it.  I am carefully documenting each step with photographs.  Hopefully by the time I'm done I will have a guide to restoring DAF-1011's that might be helpful to others.

 

 

 
Vus: 6162     Répondre: 5
gemeinsch: DAF1011- Bilder vor und nach Restauration
Ralf Keil
27.Sep.07
  1

Hallo!

Suche einige Fotos von der Chassisunterseite.
Es soll einigermassen historisch wieder hergestellt werden.
Besonders die Blockkondensatoren wären mir wichtig.
Auf dem Bild ist es ja nicht besonders "restauriert", oder?

 

Pièces jointes

Wolfgang Bauer
27.Sep.07
  2

Sg. Herr Keil,

Sie haben doch beim Modell ein Bild der Unterseite von Herrn Schneider (Bild ID = 65502).

Auf mehr Bilder klicken, dann ist es das 4. Bild.

MfG. WB.

Ralf Keil
27.Sep.07
  3

Hallo Herr Bauer!

Das erwähnte Bild ist leider etwas überbelichtet, so sind wenig Details zu sehen.

Grüsse!

Ralf Keil

Dietmar Rudolph
28.Sep.07
  4 In der Bedienanleitung zum DAF1011 gibt es ein (leider grob gerastertes) Bild von der Unterseite. Man kann aber erkennen, daß ursprünglich mehrere Becherkondensatoren vorhanden waren.


Weil das Bild ziemlich dunkel ist, hier noch ein weiteres, etwas aufgehelltes.


Mit etwas Glück läßt sich vielleicht das originale Aussehen wieder annähern.

MfG DR
Ralf Keil
01.Oct.07
  5

Allen die mir mit Bildern geholfen haben,zu erreichen das mein
DAF wieder fast original aussieht, möchte ich hier noch eimal
Dank sagen!
Anbei noch einige vorher-nachher-Bilder.
Die Kondensatoren sind bis auf die Glimmerquetscher alle neu,
in altem,PC-generierten Gewand.

Grüsse Ralf

Pièces jointes

Ralf Keil
12.Apr.15
  6

Nachdem mein DAF nach der Restauration für mich als spielbereit galt gab es doch bis jetzt immer noch mal Probleme.

Es mussten noch einige Widerstände, die ich zuerst als noch brauchbar angesehen habe, getauscht werden. Sie waren wertstabil, aber die Kontaktkappen eingerissen. Bei Erwärmung gab es immer wieder Kontaktprobleme. So wurden sie totgelegt (Abschmirgeln der Kohlebahn im Bereich der Kontaktkappen )und durch Metallschichtwiderstände 0,6W ersetzt. Sie wurden geschwärzt und unter die alten Widerstände gelötet um das Originalbild zu erhalten. Bei Leistungen über 0,5W konnten die neuen Widerstände in den Alten eingebracht werden, da der Keramikträger hohl ist. Bsp: 30k, 1,5W, eingebaut 3x 10k, je 0,6W   oder 50k, 1W, eingebaut 27k+22k je 0,6W.

Dennoch. Weiterhin sporadisch Brummen und Prasseln. Die Ursache waren eine minimal lockere Schraube am Netztrafo die mit einer der vielen Masseösen verbunden ist.

Das letzte Problem bestand in einem schlechten Schirm- Kontakt zur Gitterkappe der AF7. Trotzdem alles fest schien gab es hier noch einen Übergangswiderstand von 50-1,5k je nachdem wie man daran rührte. Also Hohlniete entfernt, Kontakt gesäubert und mit einer M2-Schraube und Mutter wieder befestigt.

Obwohl der Schirm hier "nur" statisch aufliegt gab es dort wohl immer mal wieder Probleme durch die dann wechselnde Kapazität bzw. mangelnde Schirmung.

Das Gerät hat jetzt einen Dauerlauf von ca.10 h hinter sich, versorgt von einem netten Heimsenderlein. Ohne Probleme.

 

R.K.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Vus: 2165     Répondre: 0
gemeinsch: DAF1011 (DAF 1011);
Michael John
08.Jun.07
  1

Hallo,

habe gestern (siehe Thread Schaub Bristol von mir) ein DAF-Chassis gefunden, eingebaut im Bristol.

Heute habe ich nach längerem intensivem Suchen im kompletten Haus des Verkäufers im Keller das Gehäuse gefunden.

Das Emblem vorne fehlt, weis jemand, ob es davon Nachfertigungen gibt?

Da das Gehäuse ziemlich angerostet ist, würde ich es gerne neu lackieren lassen. Hat jemand Erfahrung damit und kann mir sagen, wie man dies am Besten macht und mit welcher Farbe?

Vielen Dank und herzliche Grüße

MiJo

 
Vus: 2041     Répondre: 0
gemeinsch: DAF1011; Lautsprecher sogenannter "Taubenschlag"
Klaus Bayer
25.Jan.05
  1 Hallo zusammen,
habe hier das Unterteil des Lautsprechergehäuses da.
Es fehlt die Abdeckung des Lautsprechers selbst (auch "Laterne" genannt).
Ich möchte die Abdeckung ergänzen, bei Bedarf im Selbstbau.
Kann mir jemand die Maße für die Abdeckung von seinem Modell abnehmen ?
Gibt es evtl. noch Bilder für den Aufbau im Inneren, vorallem um den Lautsprecher herum ?
Danke schon mal
Klaus Bayer
 
Vus: 1817     Répondre: 0
gemeinsch: DAF1011;
Dirk Becker
22.Nov.03
  1 Ein Sammlerkollege der GFGF hat für den DAF 1011 irgendwann einmal in einer kleinen Auflage die Embleme der Frontseite nachfertigen lassen. Kann mir jemand weiterhelfen, wer das war, bzw. wer noch eins zu verkaufen hat? Ich würde meinen DAF gerne vervollständigen.

Gruß

Dirk Becker
 
Gemeinschaftserzeugn: Arbeitsfront-Empfänger DAF1011
Fin des contributions forum pour ce modèle

  
rmXorg